David Shechter

Recent Posts

Making the Right Choice: Homogenizer Manufacturers

Posted by David Shechter on Jul 31, 2018 11:30:00 AM

choosing high pressure homogenizerShopping for certain products is easy. If you want a fast food hamburger, you have a few well-known establishments from which to choose. If you’re looking to purchase some products to stain a deck or tend to weeds in your lawn, you most likely go to your local hardware store or one of a couple bigger, nationwide home improvement stores.

Investing in a more expensive product often requires more research and comparison. Usually, you can read customer reviews online or find ratings published by consumer organizations. When purchasing a homogenizer, however, it may be harder for you to obtain the advice needed to make the right decision.

First, let’s do a little refresher on homogenization. The primary methods used for homogenization include ultrasonic, mechanical and high-pressure, and homogenizers are used across multiple industries, such as:

  • Pharmaceutical: vaccines, antibiotics, cancer treatment and medicinal creams.
  • Food and Beverage: mayonnaise, ice cream, cream liqueurs, salad dressings, dairy products and more.
  • Biotech: creation of cost-effective medicines, modification of microorganisms, synthesization of chemicals and development of alternative biofuels.

Based on these details, the first step in finding a homogenizer manufacturer in asking yourself the following questions:

  1. Why do I need one?
  2. What differentiates one homogenizer from similar ones on the market?
  3. Does my product require a specific particle size?
  4. Which accessories are recommended and/or required for optimal performance?
  5. What motor power does my product require?
  6. Do I have a desired tube capacity and/or mixing speed?

By understanding the available options and what can best help you accomplish your specific homogenization goals, you are better equipped to select a manufacturer to meet your specific needs. It’s important to choose a manufacturer who will work with you to customize a homogenizer that delivers the best possible results. Some companies are able to customize the forces in their homogenizers to suit your application. Some even produce separate homogenizers for each phase of drug development.

Consistency is essential in homogenization, so employing the services of a manufacturer who aids you in reproducing reliable results is imperative. They should offer a homogenizer that is easy to scale and enables the product developer to quickly apply a wide variety of mixing techniques to a formulation. The manufacturer should have a reputation for reliability, offer customer referrals and provide you with at least once demonstration of their product(s).

Once you’ve decided on a manufacturer from which to purchase your homogenizer, factors to consider when choosing a brand and model include:

  • Sample types.
  • Maximum operating pressure. 
  • Mixing speed.
  • Processing setup. 
  • Processing range. 

 

BEE International: The Right Choice for the Best Reproducible Results

Our technology achieves superior results for nano emulsions, cell lysis, uniform particle reduction and related applications, and we offer homogenizers that are high-quality, customizable and reliable. Plus, we provide unparalleled customer service from demo to purchase and beyond. Contact us today for more information on our entire line of homogenization equipment.

Contact Us

Summer, Sunscreen, and Homogenization

Posted by David Shechter on Jun 13, 2018 11:30:00 AM

bee1For many people across the United States, the winter of 2017 was one of the coldest on record. Residents of the East Coast had to deal with multiple Nor'easters, shutting down airports and wreaking havoc on roadways.

For most of us, summer and the high temperatures that typically accompany it are definitely welcome. Kids are out of school, baseball games are being played and swimming pools are being opened and prepped for lazy summer days.

With the arrival of summer, though, comes a reminder about the dangers of getting too much sun. More people are diagnosed with skin cancer annually in the U.S. than all other cancers combined, and the annual cost for treating skin cancers in this country is an estimated $8.1 billion.

Skin cancer may be prevented or at least minimized through the regular use of sunscreen. In fact, scientific evidence supports the benefits of using sunscreen to reduce short- and long-term damage to the skin from the sun’s rays.  

High-pressure homogenization is a preferred method for improving the production of cosmetic creams or lotions, including sunscreen, because it offers the following benefits:

Potent Particle Size Reduction

By forcing a sample through a narrow space while applying high pressure and multiple mechanical forces, including cavitation, shear, impact and turbulence, high-pressure homogenization more effectively decreases particle size. This reduction, or micronization, creates a more homogenous mixture, provides better active ingredient dispersion and stabilizes product emulsions. It’s especially beneficial for creams, lotions and other cosmetic products because of the positive effect on the quality of these items. 

Enriched Texture and Consistency

High-pressure homogenization is often preferred over other methods because of it’s capability to create a product that is uniformly mixed. This leads to smoother texture and enhanced consistency, which is essential for beauty creams and moisturizing lotions because they have to have a combination of the right texture and consistency in order for the skin to be able to effectively absorb them. 

Strengthened Emulsion Stability

Semi-solid products such as lotions and creams are comprised of emulsions, which are a mixture of two immiscible liquids. Micronization of droplets acts to eliminate the separation of water phase of homogenization, resulting in a more permanent mixture of oil and water. This permanence extends the shelf life of these semi-solid products and improves their appearance through consistent coloring.

BEEI: Homogenizers for High-quality Creams and Lotions

If you’re searching for a cosmetic homogenizer to meet your laboratory and/or production needs, make sure you choose one that’s high quality and includes a combination of capabilities. Whether your product is a cream, lotion, makeup or personal care item, opting for a customizable high-pressure homogenizer will only improve and enhance its effectiveness.

Contact us today to learn more about our full line of homogenizers and what they can do for you.

For more information on homogenization and how to achieve efficient and consistent particle size reduction, download our FREE eBook:

New Call-to-action

Pharmaceutical Equipment Manufacturers: Five Questions to Ask Before Purchasing a Homogenizer

Posted by David Shechter on May 21, 2018 11:00:00 AM

pharmaceutical equipment manufacturers homogenizerBuying an automobile or house may be a complex process, but you often want to perform detailed research before making such a substantial purchase. You want to ensure your purchase has the capabilities you require, fits within your budget and offers a good investment.

For manufacturers of pharmaceutical equipment, doing research before buying a homogenizer or any other sizable item necessary for production is key to finding the right one. Though this process many seem time-consuming, you’ll end up with a product that best fits your needs and gives you the most benefits. Following are ten questions to ask before buying a homogenizer:

Why do I need one?

Though homogenizers are valuable tools for manufacturers in multiple industries, different models typically address different needs. For instance, maybe you need a homogenizer to mass-manufacture a product that has been approved for market. Or, perhaps you’re conducting research and development and need to disrupt yeast cells. At BEE International, we produce separate homogenizers for each phase of drug development. Make sure the product you choose is best suited to your specific business needs.

What differentiates one homogenizer from similar ones on the market?

In your research for a homogenizer, be sure to ask each manufacturer about their product’s specific capabilities and benefits. Their customer support personnel should be able to articulate any unique functions and/or specifications their products have and define ways it may be more cost-effective than competing products.

Does my product require a specific particle size?

To purchase a homogenizer which provides maximum laboratory output, you should ensure you know the required consistency in texture and size for your product to achieve safety and efficacy. Most pharmaceutical products, including vaccines, inhalants and anesthetics, need to be synthesized using a specific particle size. Many high-pressure homogenizers are able to produce emulsions, dispersions and suspensions at particle sizes of 100 µm or higher, but only a select few can achieve a size of down to 0.1 µm.

Which accessories are recommended and/or required for optimal performance?

Many times, a homogenizer without a lot of bells and whistles will perform the job for which you selected it well. However, some accessories are designed to offer benefits such as time savings, improved process accuracy and enhanced process efficiency. For example, deflector heads can facilitate homogenization of viscous material, generator probes can prevent cross-contamination and pre-assembled bead kits can make the process much easier. Check with each manufacturer to see if any specific accessories are needed for their homogenizing product to run at its highest possible level.

Do you have a demo machine we can test to see if your product meets our needs?

Before you purchase any homogenizer from any manufacturer, it’s important to try each one out to make sure it’s the best fit for your laboratory. For instance, if you handle high volumes of samples, you should try a homogenizer with a high motor capacity for optimal processing efficiency. If you have a desired mixing speed, you should examine homogenizers that let you easily achieve and maintain this speed or change it as necessary.

Other questions to ask when looking to purchase a homogenizer should center around company reputation, product warranties, level of customer service after purchase, user training and education, output capacity and ease of use. Taking the time to select the homogenizer best suited to your needs will be worth the effort.

BEE International: Trust Us with Your Homogenization Needs

At Bee International, we have extensive experience in the challenges our pharmaceutical customers face as they transition from concept, R&D, clinical trials and all-important FDA approval to manufacturing. Plus, we’re trusted by pharmaceutical researchers and laboratory managers around the world. Contact us today to learn more about our complete line of homogenizers.

For more information on the advantages of BEE homogenizers for the pharmaceutical industry, download our FREE eBook:

New Call-to-action

Lessons on Selecting a Laboratory Homogenizer

Posted by David Shechter on Mar 26, 2018 2:10:06 PM

Top view of businessman legs choosing his way-747702-edited.jpegMost of us have experienced the activity (or drudgery) of purchasing an automobile, and the process of selecting one can be extremely tedious. There are a wide array of manufacturers, models, colors and sizes from which to choose and even more options within those choices.

Fortunately, selecting a laboratory homogenizer that best meets your business needs doesn’t have to be as complicated. If you purchase a model that accommodates your required applications, it should be able to serve your homogenization needs for the long-term. Even though all laboratory homogenizers can accomplish emulsions, cell disruptions and more, understanding the commercially available homogenizing methods can make it simpler to determine the right homogenizer for a particular application.

Main Methods of Homogenization

The primary homogenization methods include ultrasonic, mechanical and high-pressure. Ultrasonic homogenizers, or sonicators, are used in cell lysis and particle size reduction applications. They are best utilized for samples which are incredibly difficult to disrupt, including tough animal tissues, spores, soil samples and liposomes. Although they are often used to process small samples in suspension and do not require pre-grinding or cutting, ultrasonic homogenizers generate heat, which can harm temperature-sensitive samples.

Mechanical homogenizers work by using pressure (shearing) and/or force to disrupt cells. They produce consistent results quickly and are able to alter a sample’s physical structure while maintaining its chemical composition. The mechanical homogenization method provides for easy scalability and especially well-suited for animal tissues and cells.

Probably the most commonly utilized method, high-pressure homogenizers have the capability to lyse cells and create emulsions, thereby enabling a longer product shelf life and an even distribution of active ingredients. They are one of the most efficient fluid processing systems for cell disruption and particle size reduction, especially for applications which require minimum particle sizes and homogenous mixtures. High-pressure homogenizers enable the study of tissues, cells and more.

Factors to consider when choosing a brand and model of laboratory homogenizer include:

  • Sample types.
  • Maximum operating pressure. 
  • Mixing speed. 
  • Processing setup. 
  • Processing range.  

Benefits of BEE International

At BEE International, our laboratory high-pressure homogenizers were designed to provide formulation scientists with more experimentation options and capabilities for emulsions, dispersions, cell rupture and liposomes. Plus, they offer a multitude of benefits and features, such as operating pressures of up to 45,000psi/3,100bar, 100 percent guaranteed scalability of results, lifetime training for new employees and students, CE and cGMP compliance and a one-year factory warranty.

Following is a list of the laboratory homogenizers we offer:

  • Nano DeBEE Laboratory Homogenizer - The smallest in our line of laboratory homogenizers, this cost-effective benchtop unit offers a reliable and consistent process for virtually any laboratory setting. With features including a state-of-the art reservoir for small volumes, an adjustable process pressure gauge, a heat exchanger and a back- pressure gauge, this is a popular choice for an entry-level laboratory homogenizer.
  • Micro DeBEE Laboratory Homogenizer – This air-operated, compact, benchtop unit is suitable for a broad range of applications, including cell disruption, particle size reduction, work with polymers and liposomes and the creation of nano and micro emulsions and dispersions. This model offers a bit more capacity and power than the Nano DeBEE Laboratory Homogenizer.
  • Mini DeBEE Laboratory Homogenizer - This cost-effective unit is suitable for both laboratory and research and development work as well as pilot plant and industrial production. It offers the same features as the Nano and Micro DeBEE Laboratory Homogenizers but with added capacity and power. Other features of this model include pressures up to 45,000 psi, 100 percent guaranteed scalability of results and a programmable logic controller a digital display.

Please contact us today to learn more about our laboratory homogenizers or any other homogenizers in our product line. No matter which model you select, they all meet our high standard of quality and offer features easily configured to meet your application needs and processing goals. 

For more information on cell lysis and the multiple methods that could be what your application needs, download our FREE eBook:

New Call-to-action

Rotor-Stator vs. High-Pressure Homogenizers: What You Need to Know

Posted by David Shechter on Mar 2, 2018 2:30:00 PM

high-pressure homogenizerIn a world where there are so many different types of products and so many versions of each, it’s easy to get confused. Sometimes I don’t want to spend five minutes in the toothpaste aisle looking through 35 different varieties of basically the same thing!

Even in the homogenization industry, there are multiple models: ultrasonic, rotor-stator bead mill, high-pressure and others. In this blog, I’ll detail rotor-stator and high-pressure homogenizers and list benefits and challenges of each.

Rotor-Stator Homogenizers

Rotor-stator homogenizers, also referred to as high-shear mixers or colloid mills, are designed to reduce particle size through hydraulic and mechanical shear and cavitation. Originally designed to make dispersions and emulsions, this type of homogenizer works through the rotation of a rotor inside a stator, which creates a suction effect. Mixing occurs when a sample is drawn in through one of the mixing heads while the blades rotate and is then expelled at a high velocity through an opening in the stator. The combination of high rpm from the rotor and exit through tiny slots allows the sample to be mechanically sheared into very small particles.

This type of homogenizer is best utilized for biological (plant and animal) tissue and processes liquid samples in the 0.01 ml-20-liter range. It is most often utilized in the chemical, cosmetic, pharmaceutical and food industries to create suspensions, emulsions, lyosols and other products through solid-liquid suspension, liquid-liquid emulsification and homogenization, particle size reduction, power-liquid dispersion and other applications.

Though high pressure-homogenizers employ high amounts of energy to form pressure differentials to homogenize ingredients, their rotor-stator counterparts manipulate ingredients though a shearing action. They generate minimal heat during operation and are able to homogenize fairly soft tissue. However, working with aerosols and foams can be difficult with this type of homogenizer.

High-pressure Homogenizers

Similar to liquid mixers, high-pressure homogenizers work by forcing cell suspensions through a very narrow channel under pressure. They use force (such as turbulence and cavitation) and high pressure to create a consistent and uniform sample. Primarily utilized for cell lysis or creating emulsions when large volumes are being processed, high-pressure homogenizers can be used for multiple types of bacteria, yeast and mycelia. Following are some of the many benefits high-pressure homogenizers provide:

  • Ability to process large volumes of liquid reproducibly and methodically. 
  • Consistency in composition of products.
  • Controlled turbulent flow and cavitation. 
  • Increased rate of dissolution.
  • Low risk of product contamination. 
  • Uniform particle size reduction.
  • Greater stability of final product.
  • Customizable forces to optimize results.
  • Consistent results in fewer passes.
  • Accommodation of a wide range of sample sizes.  
  • Decreased cost.

As you can see, high-pressure homogenizers offer enterprises a lot of benefits. However, it’s important to note that they can’t handle large particles or high-fiber materials and aren’t the most suitable for high-temperature materials. Plus, they can be large and very heavy.

BEE International: Taking the Confusion Out of Homogenization

BEE International offers homogenizers that are both high-quality and reliable. Our wide variety of laboratory, pilot-plant and industrial scale models can help you achieve high quality applications, and we’re trusted by researchers around the world for our laboratory homogenizers and customer support. Contact us today to learn more.

For more information on what you need to know about homogenization and how to achieve efficient and consistent results, download our FREE eBook:

New Call-to-action

Top Tips for Selecting a Tissue Homogenizer

Posted by David Shechter on Feb 27, 2018 2:30:00 PM

tissue homogenizerThe first thing many consumers point to when they hear the term “homogenization” is milk. August Gaulin received a patent for his homogenizer in 1899 and exhibited it to “treat” milk in 1900 at the World’s Fair in Paris.

Homogenization works by forcing the sample through a narrow space, and multiple forces  –– including turbulence and cavitation in addition to high pressure –– can act on the sample to create a high quality product. It can be used on many different types of material, such as plant, food, soil, tissue and more. In this blog, we’ll focus on tissue homogenization and what to consider when selecting a homogenizer to fit your specific business needs. 

In summary, tissue homogenization is a process employed to prepare tissue samples for further study, research or development. It involves the lysing (breaking apart) of cells to release their contents, from proteins and small molecules to DNA and RNA and more. The type of cell being lysed often dictates the homogenization device or technique that is used to complete the task. Homogenization is not only usually the simplest and safest approach to preparing such contents, it also is one of the quickest and most cost-effective methods. 

Techniques for Tissue Homogenization 

Knowing what techniques are best utilized for tissue homogenization can make choosing the right product a much easier proposition. These four techniques include chemical homogenization, freeze-thawing, and mechanical and ultrasonic homogenization. 

Chemical homogenization is best for small samples because the cost of materials used can be high for industrial-sized products. Freeze-thawing requires multiple cycles and a lot of time, and ultrasonic homogenization is only appropriate for tissues and molecules that aren’t affected by the temperature increase resulting from the high amount of heat it generates. The mechanical homogenization method can easily be scaled and offers time-efficient and consistent results. Overall, mechanical and ultrasonic homogenization are the two most commonly-used techniques.

High pressure homogenization allows for the forces of turbulence, cavitation, shear and impact to be used simultaneously to produce the best end result, even with delicate tissues. However, the lysate can be of higher quality and more even consistency when run through top-shelf equipment. 

Following is a list of things to consider when selecting a tissue homogenizer:

  • Toughness of tissue - Not all homogenizers can process more fibrous tissue, and those that can typically require a lengthy processing time.
  • Sample size and type – Large samples usually take more time to homogenize. Animal and plant tissues, yeast and bacteria typically require more rigorous methods of disruption.
  • Available components – Consider the product’s motor size, speed control and range, weight and dimensions and processing range.
  • Sample safety – The homogenizer used should be able to rapidly release the protein from its intracellular compartment into a buffer that isn’t harmful to the biological activity of the protein of interest. 
  • Uniformity of samples – The selected homogenizer should have the capability to quickly and safely produce consistent samples.


Before making a final decision on a homogenizer purchase, it’s a good idea to consult with businesses and/or laboratories with needs similar to yours. Another good idea is to request a demonstration from a couple manufacturers and compare the speed, cost and automation capabilities of the products

BEE International: The Top Choice for Tissue Homogenization

BEE International offers a number of high quality, high pressure homogenizers to achieve your goals. With our homogenizers, you will reap the benefits of our process, which includes:

  • Tighter distribution of smaller particles
  • Maximum particle size reduction in fewer passes
  • Increased manufacturing efficiency and reduced cost
To learn more about our line of homogenizers and how we can help you achieve your business goals, please contact us today. If you're looking for more information on how to lyse tissue cells, download our FREE eBook:

New Call-to-action 

Chemical Methods for Cell Disruption

Posted by David Shechter on Jan 16, 2018 11:30:00 AM

cell disruptionCell disruption is used throughout many industries, from cosmetics and pharmaceuticals to food and biotechnology. As a method or process employed to release biological molecules or other materials from inside a cell, these industries commonly utilize it to study intercellular materials or use the materials located inside a given cell. It can be achieved through a range of methods and technologies, either mechanical or non-mechanical.

The method of cell disruption selected depends on the product, scale and cell type and must obtain the necessary components effectively and reliably without disturbing any of its components. Though high-pressure homogenization is the most common procedure for cell disruption, chemical methods including osmotic lysis, surfactants and chaotropic agents also are prevalent. In this blog, we’ll go into more detail on each of these methods.

Osmotic Lysis

In osmotic lysis (or shock), cells are suspended in a hypotonic extracellular environment, usually a dilute sucrose solution, causing them to take on water, swell and burst. It’s often applied to lyse mammalian blood cells and for RNA extraction, although it is sometimes used to disrupt microbial cells. Due to its low efficiency, however, it is one of the less commonly used chemical methods of cell disruption.

Surfactants

Surfactants (surface acting agents), often called detergents, are compounds that lower surface tension and disrupt the distinct interface between hydrophobic and hydrophilic systems. Their hydrophilic head and hydrophobic tail enable them to insert into and then disperse biological membranes. They are used at fairly low concentrations, and in order to disrupt bacterial cells, they must be used with lysozyme.

Detergents used for disrupting cells are divided three categories depending on their electrical charge: anionic, cationic and non-ionic. All three directly damage the cell wall or membrane, although the best detergents can lyse cells and solubilize proteins. Surfactant cell lysis may be used with ultrasonic processing in order to facilitate disruption.

Surfactants aren’t used for cell disruption more often because they denature proteins in the process and have different impacts on biological systems depending on which detergent is utilized and what its concentration is. No one detergent can be employed for all applications, and some of those selected may disturb downstream processing steps further in the process.

Chaotropic Agents

Chaotropic agents such as urea, guanidine and sodium iodide are capable of bringing some hydrophobic compounds into aqueous solutions by disrupting the structure of water, making it a less hydrophilic environment, and weakening the hydrophobic interactions among solute molecules. Used in very high concentrations, they are like surfactants because they break non-covalent interactions. Unlike surfactants, though, chaotropic agents disrupt the weak interactions between molecules and are sometimes used with detergents to denature and emulsify biological systems.

These techniques are usually only viable at laboratory scale due to increased consumption of energy, chemicals and water and can be very costly for use in large-scale manufacturing. Conditions during the chemical disruption process aren’t always uniform among samples, making it a risky proposition. In addition, some components may cause the denaturation of protein, resulting in a damaged end product.

High-pressure Homogenization

In high-pressure homogenization, a cell disruption method most often used for soft, solid tissues, samples are forced through a narrow space while pressure is applied to them. As the temperature increases, so does the rate of cell disruption. Although they can be used for small batches, high-pressure homogenizers are scalable and can easily adapt to different sample sizes to accommodate increased demand. They not only provide a high level of disruption efficiency but also can be used for the recovery of recombinant proteins.

BEE International: Meeting the Need for Mechanical Cell Disruption

At BEE International, our high pressure homogenizing technology allows you to gently rupture cells without damaging their valuable intracellular materials. You can control the pressure, enabling rupture of a variety of cell types. No harsh chemicals are introduced into the process, and all results are 100 percent scalable to meet your manufacturing needs.

To learn more about cell disruption and how our line of high-pressure homogenizers can help you achieve your goals, please contact us today.

For more information on cell lysis methods and key factors you need to consider when choosing one, download our FREE eBook:

New Call-to-action

Food Homogenization 101: What You Need to Know

Posted by David Shechter on Dec 13, 2017 11:30:00 AM

food homogenizationThe food and beverage industry continues to expand and diversify, especially as consumers look for more healthful products that fit both their lifestyle and budget. Companies must find ways to create and market products to differentiate them from their many competitors while ensuring their goods have the taste, freshness and nutrients on which customers have come to rely.

A common method food processing and manufacturing companies utilize to efficiently, cost-effectively and safely produce their goods is high-pressure homogenization. It not only reduces particle size through forces including high pressure, shear, turbulence, acceleration and impact but also allows for the stable and consistent production of emulsions, suspensions and other commodities that necessitate a liquid suspended in another liquid.

Though one of the most well-known uses of homogenization in the food and beverage industry is for milk, it is also widely used in the manufacture of sauces, spreads, salad dressings, fruit juices and concentrates, fish and meat paté, sweeteners, baby food, egg product, other dairy products and more. The homogenization pressures used for these products typically range between 20 and 60 MPa, but some homogenizers can reach pressures of up to 400 MPa. This magnitude of pressure leads to microbial and enzyme inactivation, which enhances the safety and shelf life of perishable foods while reducing the thermal effects on the foods’ functional and sensory qualities.

Once a company achieves its ideal product, the product needs to be reproduced on a larger scale without losing the characteristics that make it desirable by customers. If it doesn’t offer the same taste and texture on a regular basis, the manufacturer may not only lose customers and their funds but also obtain a damaged reputation.

Food homogenizers help deliver a product with uniform texture, flavoring and taste through a scalable and cost-effective process that allows for a longer period of freshness than food comprised of larger particles. The smaller the particles, the longer the structure of the product can be maintained. Food homogenizers’ ability to use pressure instead of heat preserves critical nutritional components naturally found in a food, enabling them to be available for consumption.

Although high-pressure homogenization may potentially replace thermal methods of food preparation, it does not effectively produce solid foods or ones formed from large particles. Also, because it uses force instead of thermal action, homogenization does not sterilize foods or beverages, requiring it to be accomplished through a separate process.

BEE International: Help in Finding the Best Food Homogenizer

The key to purchasing the right food homogenizer for your business needs is selecting one that can achieve consistent particle size distribution on a scalable basis. At BEE International, our equipment can engineer particle sizes at or below 100 nm, a benefit favorable for most any product in the food and beverage industry. Our products are trusted by researchers and laboratory managers around the world, and our unparalleled customer service will make finding the right product a breeze for companies of all sizes.

Contact us today to find out more about how BEE International can aid your particle size reduction process. 

For more information on the key factors to consider when choosing a cell lysis method, download our FREE eBook:

New Call-to-action

How to Pick Out a Homogenizer for Cell Lysis

Posted by David Shechter on Oct 26, 2017 11:30:00 PM

Thinking woman in glasses looking up with light idea bulb above head isolated on gray wall background-603464-edited.jpegCell lysis is commonly described as the process of releasing biological molecules from inside a cell, and is a powerful method utilized in a variety of manufacturing industries, including pharmaceutical, cosmetic, biotech, and R&D settings. With the popularity of this technology, more and more industry professionals are seeking out homogenizers to assist with the process of cell lysis. However, before settling on the right homogenizer for the job, it is important to understand more about cell lysis and what it entails.

During the process of cell lysis, in order to thoroughly study and analyze the behavior of molecules, the cells that produce the molecules in question must be disrupted. Disruption of cells can be achieved in numerous ways, including cryopulverization, nitrogen decompression, or through using a homogenizer.  Each method comes with varying degrees of complexity, ease, and success.

Cryopulverization is one way of accomplishing cell lysis, and is most often used for cellular samples with a tough outer matrix, such as cartilage, connective tissue, or seeds. In this method, the samples are reduced to a powder through the use of liquid nitrogen and impact pulverization. This method, while successful, is often time consuming and expensive.

Nitrogen decompression, as the name suggests, uses large quantities of nitrogen to achieve cell lysis. In this particular method, nitrogen is dissolved in the cell under very high pressures. When the pressure is released, the nitrogen violently escapes the cell, causing disruption and breakage of the cell walls. While nitrogen decompression is successful in disrupting certain types of cells – plant cells, bacteria, and other fragile cell types are most receptive to this treatment – it has not been proven to be effective in disrupting cells with tougher outer matrices, such as yeast, spores, and fungus.

Homogenization is arguably the most widely used method of cell lysis, especially for small volumes of cells and/or cultured cells. This method involves the use of shearing force on the cell. This is achieved by forcing the small cell through an even smaller sized orifice. This removes the outer layer and lyses the cell.

BEE International offers a number of high-quality homogenizers to meet the needs of any industry when it comes to the process of cell lysis and disruption. Our laboratory grade homogenizers include the Nano DeBEE, Micro DeBEE, and Mini DeBEE – all three are easy to use, offer consistent and reliable results, and easily scale up for full scale production. In addition, our homogenizers offer maximum experimentation capabilities, the ability to change flow, pressure, shear, and impact settings, and offer high pressures up to 45,000 PSI for maximum effectiveness with cell lysis and disruption.

Contact us today to learn more about how our line of homogenizers can help you meet your production needs. We are more than happy to help you get started on your next big project, and to help you choose the right homogenizer for the most efficient and effective cell lysis.

How to Choose A Cell Lysis Method

If you’re looking for more information on how to pick the best cell lysis method for your application, download our free eBook “7 Key Factors to Consider When Choosing a Cell Lysis Method”. This eBook contains practical, clear facts and insights for live science researchers and laboratory managers who want to improve existing products, enhance efficient manufacturing processes, and achieve remarkable results for new innovations. Download it here:

New Call-to-action

4 Techniques in Cell Homogenization

Posted by David Shechter on Jul 6, 2017 11:30:00 AM

Cell HomogenizationCell homogenization, also known as cell micronization or cell fractionation, is the action of reducing the particle size of molecules to facilitate even distribution and emulsification of liquids, creams, or other mediums. This process is extremely common and is used in a number of growing industries: chemical, pharmaceutical, biotech, cosmetic, and food.

In the world of cell homogenization, there are several techniques that are commonly used to achieve this task. All of the methods involve encouraging the cells to lyse, or break apart. Cell homogenization can be achieved through various methods, including mechanical disruption, liquid homogenization, sonication, or manual grinding. Continue reading for a brief overview of each method of cell homogenization.

Mechanical Disruption

Mechanical disruption involves the use of rotating blades. These blades work to grind and disperse cells, and they are most effective at homogenizing tissues such as liver.  Rotor-stator homogenizers are one of the best homogenizing tools used in mechanical disruption and can homogenize samples in the volumes from 0.01 milliliters to up to 20 liters, depending on the type of motor that is used. Sample loss is typically minimal, and small amounts of samples and tissues can easily be homogenized using this method.

Liquid Homogenization

Liquid homogenization is the most widely used cell disruption technique, especially with small volumes and cultured cells. In this method, cells are lysed by the action of being forced through a small space, which acts to shear the cell membranes. There are several types of liquid homogenizers on the market, including Potter-Elvehjem homogenizers, french presses, and the dounce homogenizer.

Sonication

Sonication is a type of physical disruption used to lyse cells. This method uses high frequency sound waves to lyse cells, bacteria, and other types of tissue. The sound waves are delivered via a probe that is immersed in the liquid cell suspension. This method, while common, is often time consuming and is best suited for volumes of less than 100 mL.

Manual Grinding

Manual grinding, while one of the most time consuming methods of cell homogenization, is also the most common. In this method, a mortar and pestle is used to manually grind cells. While not suitable for extremely large volumes, this method is the most effective at breaking apart plant tissue cells.

BEE International offers a wide variety of high pressure homogenizers to meet the needs of virtually any industry. Our technology is well suited for nano emulsions, cell lysis, uniform particle reduction, and other related applications.

Contact us today to learn more about how our line of homogenizers can help with your company’s needs.

Also, be sure to check out our FREE eBook on 7 key factors to consider when choosing a cell lysis method

New Call-to-action