What Does a Homogenizer Do?

Posted by David Shechter on Jul 16, 2019, 9:25:31 AM

What Does a Homogenizer Do?There are many types of homogenizers, from the basic kitchen blender and handheld, laboratory dounce homogenizer that use mechanical force to break apart and blend food or other “ingredients” to the numerous kinds of large, industrial homogenizers that rely on pressure to effectively disrupt and mix microscopic components of a sample. There are even ultrasonic homogenizers that use cavitation to produce similar results. But just what does a homogenizer do, you might wonder? How does it work?

 

While the specifics of how a homogenizer does what it does changes based on the composition of the materials on hand and the proposed intent of the product to be made, the basic premise of what it does is always the same. Thus, despite the fact that there are dozens of different types of homogenizers, all of them basically do the same thing: apply force(s) in order to separate the parts of one substance and thoroughly mix them with the parts of another.

 

Why Use Homogenizers?

Homogenizers are used to completely mix a solid, liquid or gas into another substance, but they also offer several other key benefits and, thus, are invaluable across numerous industrial, chemical, biotechnological and food manufacturing processes. Specifically, in addition to the aforementioned blending purpose, businesses use homogenizers to reduce the particle size of various types of substances; facilitate the elimination of pathogens in food products (also known as pasteurization); improve the stability, appearance and texture of chemical compounds (including things such as paint, makeup and medications); increase the bioavailability of pharmaceutical products; extend product shelf life; maintain consistent levels of quality; and reduce manufacturing costs.

 

In short, homogenizers enable companies to guarantee efficacy and efficiency no matter their application. Indeed, some homogenizers achieve results by agitating and stirring. Some do it by crushing and grinding. Others push suspensions through narrow passages, and some use pressure and impact. But regardless of the type of force used, all homogenizers aim to mix together two naturally immiscible substances so that any number of the above benefits can occur.

 

Ready to Learn More?

Homogenizers do a lot of different things, making them useful tools that foster a myriad of advantages across several separate industries. If you need assistance determining the type of homogenizer best suited to your needs, contact our team at BEE International. Our homogenizers combine high pressure with turbulence, cavitation, impact and shear forces, which, when coupled with our patented Emulsifying Cell (EC) technology, serves to improve manufacturing and laboratory processes and saves you valuable time and money.

 

And for additional information, feel free to download our complimentary eBook, “How to Achieve Efficient & Consistent Particle Size Reduction." In it, we detail how our proprietary in-line processing technology maximizes particle size reduction in fewer passes and helps you maintain cost-effective manufacturing practices.

 

New Call-to-action

Homogenizer