How Does an Ultrasonic Homogenizer Change the Homogenization Process?

Posted by Deb Shechter on Jan 13, 2017 12:30:00 PM

ultrasonic homogenizersHomogenization – also known as micronization or simply particle size reduction, is a process that is utilized in a number of growing industries: pharmaceutical, biotech, cosmetic, and food are just a few of the industries that use this innovative technique. Homogenization represents just one way of reducing a given particle’s size, and within the field of homogenization, there are numerous ways to achieve that task. Ultrasonic homogenizers and high pressure homogenizers are two pieces of machinery that are often looked at by those interested in particle size reduction. However, before selecting the right homogenizer for the task at hand, it is important to understand how each of these two types of homogenizers work. Continue reading to learn more about ultrasonic homogenizers and how they change the homogenization process.

Ultrasonic Homogenizers

Ultrasonic homogenizers are also known as sonicators, and are often used for the homogenization and lysis of smaller samples that do not require traditional grinding or rotor-stator cutting techniques for processing, such as laboratory samples. Ultrasonic homogenizers utilize ultrasonic probes to get the job done. These probes, which come in a variety of sizes, are often made of titanium or another chemical resistant material, and allow for a variety of sample volumes to be processed.

Ultrasonic homogenizers are very efficient for the reduction of both soft and hard particles, and since there are few moving parts involved, there is less frictional wear and cleaning time involved. Ultrasonic homogenizers also allow for a great deal of control over the parameters influencing the homogenization process. However, ultrasonic homogenizers can generate a great deal of heat, which can be harmful to samples that are temperature-sensitive.

High Pressure Homogenizers

High Pressure Homogenizers, like Ultrasonic Homogenizers, are also adept at reducing the particle size of a number of materials. Similar to ultrasonic homogenizers, high pressure homogenizers also use the force of cavitation; however, other forces, such as shear and impact, are also used. This allows for a gentle (but very effective) process of particle size reduction.

BEE International offers a number of high quality homogenizers to meet the needs of virtually every industry. Benefits include:

  • Gentle and effective particle size reduction
  • Better results in fewer passes
  • Scalable results
  • Suitable for cell disruption, particle size reduction, nano & micro emulsions and dispersions
  • Easy cleaning and maintenance
  • Lifetime training for new employees and students

To learn more about our suite of high pressure homogenizers, please contact us today. Our free Nano DeBEE product brochure is also available for download here.

For more information on cell lysis methods and how to choose the right one, download our FREE eBook:

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Homogenization vs. Pasteurization: What’s the Difference?

Posted by David Shechter on Jan 12, 2017 12:30:00 PM

homogenization vs pasteurizationHomogenization, also known as particle size reduction or micronization, is an essential step utilized in a number of growing industries: pharmaceutical, biotech, chemical, cosmetic, and food. The act of homogenization allows for numerous benefits to the end product: longer shelf life, increased stability of the final product, and lower overall cost. It’s no wonder more and more companies are taking advantage of this powerful process!

However, before choosing the right homogenizer for the task at hand, it is important to understand what homogenization is – and what is isn’t. When asked to describe homogenization, many people mistake it with a different process – pasteurization. And while the two processes have their similarities, they are very different. Continue reading to learn more about the critical differences between homogenization and pasteurization.

Pasteurization

Pasteurization was first invented in 1864, when French scientist Louis Pasteur discovered that the bacteria that caused spoilage in beer and wine could be killed simply through heat. This discovery was revolutionary, as it allowed these and other products to enjoy a longer shelf life and increased quality. Today, pasteurization is used in a number of industries, including dairy, food, wine, and other beverages – both alcoholic and non-alcoholic.  While pasteurization is not designed to kill all of the bacteria present in any given product, it greatly reduces the number of harmful pathogens, making milk and other beverages safe for human consumption.

Homogenization

Homogenization, on the other hand, is an entirely separate process from pasteurization – in most cases, this step occurs after pasteurization. Homogenization does not do much when it comes to eliminating bacteria, but it has another crucial benefit – it works to improve the quality and taste of food. In the case of milk, this is achieved by breaking down fat molecules so that they resist separation. The end result is an evenly mixed finished product that looks – and tastes – smooth, creamy, and consistent.

Choosing the Right Homogenizer

With the main differences out of the way, you can now choose the right homogenizer for your industry’s needs. BEE International offers a number of high quality, high pressure homogenizers for the needs of virtually every industry. Our homogenizers work well in any setting – from small labs all the way up to pilot plants and full scale production.

Contact us today to learn more about our homogenizers and how they can help your company achieve its production goals.

For more information about homogenization and cell lysis methods, download our FREE eBook:

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Choosing the Right Chemical Process Equipment: 3 Things to Look For

Posted by David Shechter on Jan 11, 2017 12:30:00 PM

chemical processing equipmentHomogenization, also known as particle size reduction or micronization, is used across many industries – including pharmaceutical, chemical, food, and cosmetic -- to create stable emulsions and dispersions. While there are a number of machines that can perform the task of homogenization, it is important to choose the right homogenizer to ensure the best result with the highest level of quality. Continue reading to learn more about three things you should look for when choosing this important chemical process equipment.

Creation of High Quality Dispersions

Dispersions, also known as suspensions, consist of solid particles distributed throughout a continuous medium. Examples of dispersions include polymers, petroleum additives, paints, and acrylics. It is important to create high quality dispersions in the production of these items to ensure maximum particle packing, increased conductivity, and improved overall surface quality.

Ability to Decrease Particle Size

When choosing a homogenizer, it is important to choose a high pressure homogenizer that can efficiently and readily decrease particle sizes. Smaller particle sizes result in easier dissolution, increased product stability, and higher overall quality. This results in increased customer satisfaction as well as reduced costs of production.

Improvement of Chemical Reaction Processes

There are numerous benefits in the reduction of particle sizes in the manufacturing industry. Smaller particles result in faster reaction times and lower temperatures in the world of chemical processing, which results in increased efficiency and lower overall labor costs. Additionally, since homogenizers use pressure instead of heat to reduce particle size, the stability and shelf life of the resulting product is often increased.

High Pressure Homogenizers from BEE International

BEE International offers a number of high pressure homogenizers to meet the needs of virtually every industry. Our homogenizers are ideal for just about any environment, including laboratory and R&D settings, pilot plants, and industrial manufacturing zones. In addition, our homogenizers offer the following benefits and features:

  • Ability to scale to manufacturing
  • Unique processing setups to address specific processing challenges
  • Dual Feeds to allow for the addition of abrasive and viscous materials
  • Dual Jets that are capable for reducing particle sizes for the hardest of materials
  • Pressurized feeds that allow formation and dispersion of final products in one step
  • Increase in dense cross section of final products
  • Better particle coating during formulations

Contact us today to learn more about our high pressure homogenizers and how they can help with particle size reduction in your industry.

For more information on particle size reduction, download our FREE eBook here:

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Emulsions vs. Dispersions: What is the Difference?

Posted by Deb Shechter on Jan 10, 2017 12:30:00 PM

emulsions versus dispersionsHomogenization is the process of reducing particle size of molecules to aid in more efficient and higher quality emulsions and dispersions. This technique is used across numerous industries: pharmaceutical, biotech, cosmetic, drug, and food. However, before you begin your search for the right homogenizer to perform the task at hand, it is important to understand the world of emulsions and dispersions: what are they? How are they created? What are the differences between them? Although the terms are often used interchangeably, there are some key differences between the two. Continue reading to learn more about dispersions and emulsions and how to choose the correct homogenizer for your industry’s needs.

Emulsions

An emulsion is defined as a heterogeneous system consisting of two liquids that are incapable of being mixed together. One example of a possible emulsion would be a mixture of oil and water – two immiscible liquids. To prevent the liquids from separating out – as they tend to do – a third liquid, called a surfactant, is added. The surfactant works to prevent the liquids from separating, and allows one liquid to be evenly dispersed into the other. When oil is the liquid that is dispersed, the emulsion is classified as an oil-in-water emulsion. Conversely, when water is the liquid that is dispersed, the emulsion is known as a water-in-oil dispersion.

Dispersions

Dispersions are also known as suspensions, and consist of solid particles – ranging anywhere from 0.001 micrometers to 1 micrometer -- distributed evenly throughout a continuous medium. Examples of dispersions include ink, dyes, and even food items, like barbecue sauce. While the process of dispersing is often referred to as grinding or milling, no particle grinding actually occurs. Instead, equipment like colloid mills, sand mills, or high pressure homogenizers are used to create dispersions.

Choosing the Right Homogenizer for your Needs

When creating a dispersion or emulsion for your industry’s application, it is important to choose a high quality homogenizer. A good high pressure homogenizer uses a large amount of energy to create emulsions, which means that less surfactant is needed to get the job done.  Similarly, when creating dispersions, high pressure homogenizers are highly efficient at creating very small particle sizes.

BEE International Homogenizers

BEE International has a number of high quality homogenizers to meet the needs of your industry. Our homogenizers work for virtually every setting, including laboratories, pilot plants, and industrial production. Contact us today to learn more about how our high pressure homogenizers can meet your specialized needs.

For more information on particle size reduction and how to achieve efficient and consistent results, download our FREE eBook:

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High Pressure Homogenization and Food Production: 3 Key Benefits

Posted by Tal Shechter on Jan 9, 2017 12:30:00 PM

homogenization food industryHomogenization, also known as micronization or particle size reduction, is heavily utilized in a number of industries, including (but not limited to): cosmetic, drug, pharmaceutical, biotech, and food. The process of homogenization offers many benefits to finished goods produced in virtually every industry. Continue reading to learn more about the benefits that high pressure homogenization offers as it relates to food production.

Pathogen Elimination

One of the notable benefits of high pressure homogenization is the elimination of harmful bacteria from food products. High pressure homogenization is becoming an increasingly popular way of eliminating pathogens from food without interfering with taste or quality.  The high pressure of homogenization, along with eliminating bacteria, also works to preserve the food.

Extension of Shelf Life

Another benefit of high pressure homogenization in the food industry is an extended shelf life of food products. The high pressure of homogenization results in improved chemical stability of foods, which allows them to stay fresh for longer, especially with foods comprised of small particles.

Improved Taste, Consistency, and Appearance

Perhaps one of the most important benefits, at least as it relates to consumers, has to do with the improved taste, consistency, and appearance of food that is processed using high pressure homogenization. Juice, milk, and other beverages have shown marked improvements in consistency and viscosity due to high pressure homogenization, which acts to suspend particles during processing.

BEE International offers a number of high quality high pressure homogenizers to meet the needs of virtually every industry. We offer homogenization equipment for laboratory use, pilot plant applications, and full scale industrial manufacturing.

Our homogenizers offer the following benefits and features:

  • CE and cGMP compliant
  • Pharma/Bio/Food sanitary
  • Synchronized pump system for constant pressure
  • Password operated protection
  • Menu guided maintenance and calibration
  • Patented emulsifying cell
  • Guaranteed scalability of results

To learn more about BEE International and how we can aid your homogenization process in the food industry, please contact us today. Our free eBook, “7 Key Factors to Consider When Choosing a Cell Lysis Method” can be downloaded here:

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High Pressure Processing Equipment and Pasteurization

Posted by David Shechter on Jan 4, 2017 12:30:00 PM

high_pressure_processing_equipment_pasteurization.jpgHomogenization, also known as micronization or particle size reduction, is perhaps most widely recognized as it relates to the dairy industry. Homogenization of milk involves the breaking down of fat molecules in milk so that they resist separation. Smaller fat molecules allow for a more even suspension and dispersion in milk, which results in a more pleasant looking (and tasting!) end product. Homogenization of milk is a mechanical process that prevents cream from rising to the top of milk; this also leads to a longer shelf life. Other benefits of homogenized milk include:

  • Milk from different herds of cows can be mixed without issues
  • Thanks to a longer shelf life, milk can be shipped greater distances
  • Homogenization makes it easier for dairies to filter out fat, resulting in two percent, one percent, and skim milk
  • The reduced size of fat molecules allow the milk fats to be more readily absorbed

Pasteurization of milk, on the other hand, occurs before the homogenization step and is a more involved process that involves heating milk up and then quickly cooling it down. This allows for a longer shelf life, and also kills many (but not all) microorganisms often found in milk.

What BEE International Has to Offer

In the field of pasteurization, BEE International is hard at work to ensure the most effective, repeatable, stable, and high quality methods of pasteurization in order to remove food borne pathogens, reduce costs, and improve shelf life of pasteurized products.

Our High Pressure Processing (HPP) equipment offers the following benefits:

  • Color and flavor retention
  • Improved shelf life
  • Improved texture
  • Better retention of nutritional values, sensory and microbiological quality
  • Supports growing demand for organic and preservative free products
  • Vitamins and anti-oxidants stay in the food rather than being removed and re-added
  • Designed for enhanced experimentation
  • Hold times can be easily adjusted while maintaining maximum pressure and continuous flow
  • Optimum results in fewer passes can be achieved
  • Pressures of up to 45,000 psi are available
  • Modular design allows for the processing of pulpy and viscous food products

To learn more about our technology and how it can be customized for your application for efficient and consistent results, please contact us today. You can also view an animation of our technology by clicking here.

For more information on particle size reduction and how to get consistent results, download our FREE eBook:

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Creating Stable Dispersions with Homogenizers

Posted by Deb Shechter on Jan 3, 2017 12:30:00 PM

create_stable_dispersions_with_homogenizer.jpgHomogenization, also known as micronization or particle size reduction, is an incredibly common process that is shared by numerous industries, including pharmaceutical, biotech, cosmetic, food, and drug. In the cosmetic industry, for example, homogenization is used when an even mixture — or dispersion — of an active ingredient is desired within a lotion or cream.

The first step to creating an even dispersion is ensuring that solids are efficiently mixed with liquids. This task is not always an easy one, and comes with its own sets of challenges:

  • Instability
  • Agglomeration
  • Inability to Reduce Particle Size
  • Contamination

BEE International Equipment 

At BEE International, we offer a high quality line of homogenizers that can meet the needs of your industry while avoiding the common occurrences and challenges that come with the field of homogenization. Our systems are designed to produce even dispersions and emulsions, and are suitable for virtually every application, from small scale laboratory applications all the way to pilot plants and 24/7 industrial operations. 

Our laboratory homogenizers include the Nano DeBEE, Micro DeBEE, and Mini DeBEE, which are perfect for a smaller laboratory setting and offer capabilities for emulsions, dispersions, cell rupture, and more. Our line of laboratory homogenizers offer these additional benefits:

  • Capacity of up to 400 mL/min and 22 L/hr
  • Maximum operating pressures of up to 45,000 psi (3,100 bar)
  • Equipped with spare parts and tools
  • Results are scalable and repeatable
  • Easy to clean, use, and maintain

Our pilot and industrial homogenizers offer even more flexibility, and are suitable for the ever-growing needs of pilot plants and industrial applications. Our pilot plant and industrial homogenizers include the DeBEE 2000, DeBEE 3000, and DeBEE 4000; these homogenizers come equipped with our unique intensifier technology, and offer unprecedented reliability and versatility. Other benefits include:

  • Constant pressure with electronic synchronization
  • Numerous cylinder sizes available to meet pressure capacities
  • Unique Clean in Place (CIP) technology
  • PLC controlled homogenizers
  • Synchronized pump system for constant pressure
  • Menu guided maintenance and calibration

Other features of our homogenizers include:

  • Better particle packing
  • Dense and uniform distribution of materials
  • Improved bioavailability of pharmaceutical suspensions
  • Elimination of un-dissolved polymer components

Contact us today at BEE International to learn more about our line of high pressure homogenizers, and how our equipment can work to meet the needs of your industry. Our FREE eBook, “7 Key Factors to Consider When Choosing a Cell Lysis Method” is also available for download:

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What is Cell Disruption?

Posted by Tal Shechter on Dec 30, 2016 12:30:00 PM

what_is_cell_disruption.jpgCell disruption is the process of releasing molecules or other materials from inside a cell. The action of cell disruption is used in various industries, including pharmaceutical, biotech, cosmetic, food, and drug, and is commonly used by these industries to study intercellular materials or to use the materials that are located inside of a given cell.

Cell disruption can be either a preliminary step to homogenization — the act of micronizing or reducing particle size — , or it can take place simultaneously. In either case, cell disruption can occur via various methods. Continue reading to learn more about the methods for cell disruption.

Bead Method

In the bead method of cell disruption, the cells in question are disrupted via small glass, ceramic, or steel beads mixed with the sample that is suspended in media. In the bead method, the sample and bead mixture is manually agitated by either stirring or shaking.  This is a very common method that is popular in laboratory settings with small amounts of media, and is often used to disrupt yeast cells, as well as various types of animal and plant tissues.

Cryopulverization

The method of cryopulverization is often utilized when dealing with cells with a tougher outer membrane, such as animal connective tissues, cartilage, or seeds. In this method, the material in question is reduced to a very fine powder by impact pulverization at very low (liquid nitrogen) temperatures. Like the bead method mentioned above, cryopulverization is a very manual (and often slow) process.

Microfluidization

Microfluidization is a common method of cell disruption that is often used for proteins, enzymes, and cells, such as E. Coli. In this method, micro channels with fixed geometry are paired with an intensifier pump to achieve high shear rates that easily disrupt even the toughest of cells. While changes in viscosity are often noted with other methods of cell disruption, microfluidization avoids this phenomena, making it an attractive choice for cell disruption.

Nitrogen Decompression

Nitrogen decompression is the method of choice when dealing with more sensitive enzymes, organelles, and cells. In this particular method, large quantities of nitrogen are first dissolved in the cell under high pressure. As the gas pressure is released, the nitrogen escapes, which works to rupture and release the contents of the cell. This technique is used to homogenize cells and tissues, and produces an even dispersion of cells.

To learn more about cell disruption and how our line of high pressure homogenizers can help you achieve your goals, please contact us today.

For more information on particle size reduction and how to achieve efficient and consistent results, download our FREE eBook:

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How to Choose the Right Inline Homogenizer

Posted by Deb Shechter on Dec 28, 2016 12:30:00 PM

choose-the-right-inline-homogenizer.jpgHomogenization, also known as particle size reduction or micronization, is the process of reducing the particle size of molecules in order to facilitate dispersion, emulsion, or otherwise distributing microscopic particles throughout a given medium. This process is widely used across several industries, including pharmaceutical, biotechnology, cosmetic, drug, and food.

When selecting the right homogenizer for your application, it is important to think about your industries’ needs, as well as the needs of your particular process. There are two main types of homogenizers offered:

Batch Homogenizers

Batch homogenizers are typically a stand-alone unit. In this type of homogenizer, all of the ingredients are mixed in a tank before being homogenized. Batch homogenizers are useful for smaller volumes (typically less than 400 gallons).

Inline Homogenizers

Inline homogenizers are positioned within the production line, and allow for continuous homogenization. These types of homogenizers are suitable for any size production volume, and are ideal for continuous processing of dispersions and emulsions.

Inline homogenizers are more commonly used in pilot plant and industrial applications, where larger production volumes are needed; however, they are also useful in smaller lab or R&D settings. Inline homogenizers are an efficient and economical choice, and allow for greater control over the mixing and homogenization process, since they are fitted within the production line with the flow of product. This allows for greater consistency in the mixing and homogenization process, and improved and consistent results for each production batch.

Inline homogenizers also offer the following benefits:

  • Significant reduction of the chances of contamination
  • Product remains within a closed pipeline system
  • Work well with Clean In Place (CIP) systems
  • Easy to disassemble, clean, and maintain
  • Positively affect the aesthetics of the final product
  • Create stable and consistent emulsions and dispersions
  • Rapidly dissolve solid material and accelerate chemical reactions

BEE International offers a number of inline high pressure homogenizers to suit virtually any production need. Our DeBEE High Pressure Homogenizing Systems offer reliable and consistent operation, ensuring repeatable results for any industry.  Our systems have a solid reputation for reliability and consistent results, and offer the following features:

  • Computerized control and monitoring
  • Constant pressure to the homogenizing cell
  • Online spare intensifier pump
  • Simple maintenance with easy access and computer scheduling

Please contact us today to learn m 7ore about how BEE International’s line of high pressure homogenizers can help with your industrial homogenization needs.

For more information on homogenizers, cell lysis methods, and how to pick the right one, download our FREE eBook:

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How Do Dounce Homogenizers Work?

Posted by David Shechter on Dec 27, 2016 12:30:00 PM

how-do-dounce-homogenizers-work.jpgHomogenization is the process of reducing particles to a microscopic size in order to facilitate the creation of emulsions and dispersions. This process is also known as micronization or particle size reduction. Homogenization is widely used across several different industries, including pharmaceutical, biotech, drug, cosmetic, and food. When choosing the correct homogenization technique for your application, it is important to understand the needs of your particular industry, as well as how different homogenization techniques (and homogenizers) operate.

There are several methods of cell homogenization that are commonly used. Continue reading for a brief explanation of each type of cell homogenization:

Mechanical Disruption

  • Involve the use of rotating blades to grind and disperse cells
  • Most effective at homogenizing cell tissues, such as liver
  • Can homogenize small volumes, up to 20 liters
  • Sample loss is minimal

Sonication

  • Physical disruption used to lyse cells
  • Uses high frequency sound waves to lyse cells, bacteria, and other tissue types
  • Time consuming and best used for small volumes (<100mL)

Manual Grinding

  • Mortar and pestle is used to manually grind cells
  • Best suited for breaking apart plant tissue cells
  • Best used for small volumes
  • Time consuming

Liquid Homogenization

  • Most widely used cell disruption technique
  • Cells are lysed by the action of being forced through a small space
  • Suitable for use with small volumes as well as cultured cells

Liquid homogenization is the most commonly used homogenization technique. In the world of liquid homogenization, there are several types of homogenizers that are designed to complete the task: Potter-Elvehjem homogenizers, French Presses, and the Dounce Homogenizer.

The Dounce Homogenizer, also known as a tissue grinder, works by manually disrupting cells. This type of homogenizer is ideal for preparation of cell lysates or other tissues, and is particularly useful in preparations where heat build up is to be avoided. The Dounce homogenizer is typically made of glass – this allows for easier cleaning and sterilization between uses -- and consists of two different sized pestles that are used to manually lyse cells. One pestle fits tightly within the shaft of the dounce; this allows for maximum friction and cell disruption. The other pestle has a looser fit and works well to create a homogenous sample.

Contact us today to learn more about our line of high pressure homogenizers, as well as which homogenizer would work best for the needs of your industry.

For more information on particle size reduction and how to achieve efficient and consistent results, download our FREE eBook:

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