BEE International Blog

4 Safety Tips for High Pressure Homogenizer Use

Posted by Tal Shechter on May 31, 2016 3:30:00 PM

High Pressure HomogenizersHigh pressure homogenizer use is widespread, occurring internationally in labs that reduce particle size, lyse cells, create emulsions, and more. Yet considering the impressive number of people who come in contact with a homogenizer, there is a scarcity of literature that details safety tips and/or warnings. Of course, training in safe operation of a laboratory device before using it is necessary. However, particularly after using the same device for a long period of time, a safety refresher can be invaluable. Here we present some key hazards and tips for handling a homogenizer safely, so that it may be used effectively.

Hazard #1: Contact with rotating shaft and/or homogenizing head

The rotating shaft is key to a homogenizer’s particle size reduction ability, and the homogenizing head houses the narrow gap that a sample is forced through. Yet contact with either component can cause injury. To avoid contact and related injury, always switch off the machine before cleaning or changing screens.

Hazard #2: Manual handling of the homogenizing head

The homogenizing head can be raised or lowered to provide customization to a sample. Yet improper handling can cause both machine malfunction and minor injury to the handler. Simple training in safe equipment adjustment should be sufficient for the user to avoid injuring himself/herself and the homogenizer.

Hazard #3: Noise that can reach unsafe levels

This tip may or may not be relevant, depending on the homogenizer model and manufacturer. Some homogenizers can reach 85 dBA, and potentially cause ear damage. To avoid this hazard, a user can wear ear defenders when operating the equipment and/or decrease the period of exposure.

Hazard #4: Electrical equipment

Simple training in the use of both homogenizers and their associated plug-ins/electrical equipment should be sufficient to avoid electrocution or shock.

BEE International: The Homogenizer Advantage

As you work to determine which high-pressure homogenizer brand and model will be best suited for your laboratory, begin your search with BEE International Technology. We are globally recognized among laboratory managers and researchers for our high quality products and excellent customer support. Cell lysis and particle size reduction are two of a variety of applications for BEEI homogenizers; nano/micro emulsions, lipids, suspensions, and dispersions are also easily achievable.

Importantly, BEEI’s homogenizers can achieve consistent particle sizes at or below 100 nm, a key benefit for products that require smaller droplet sizes. Additionally, the homogenizer processes can be controlled to suit your product, which will allow you to customize to your cell type. And finally, the equipment is easy to use, produces higher yield in less time, and achieves results that are reproducible and scalable.

Learn more about how BEE homogenizers can improve your experimentation by contacting us today. For more information on how to achieve efficient and consistent particle size reduction, download our FREE eBook:  New Call-to-action

Topics: High Pressure, Homogenizer

Cell Lysis 101: 6 Ways to Disrupt Cells

Posted by Tal Shechter on May 27, 2016 12:30:00 PM

cell disruptionCell disruption is a technique that most scientists use on a daily basis; although seemingly simple, each method’s effectiveness determines the accessibility of intracellular molecules. Therefore, the importance of selecting an appropriate method cannot be understated. Cell disruption techniques can be split into chemical and physical methods; read on to learn about which will work best with your cell type and molecule of interest.

Chemical Methods (1)

  1. Detergents/Surfactants: Interchangeably termed, detergents can rupture a membrane by inserting themselves within its structure and unfolding membrane proteins. Every detergent’s chemical properties and mechanism of action differs; yet it is a very effective cell lysis method, particularly for small samples.
  2. Enzymes: Enzyme treatment is frequently used as the first step of a cell disruption technique. It works by breaking down cell walls, removing unwanted contaminants, generating protoplasts, and promoting DNA isolation by breaking down DNA-binding proteins.

Physical Methods

  1. Bead Mills: Scientists will often turn to bead mills for hard-to-disrupt samples over other mechanical methods. The combination of grinding beads with the rotational homogenizer enables powerful mixing action. An added bonus: because it is a closed system, the bead mill has a decreased risk of cross-contamination.
  2. Grinding: When a sample is placed between two hard surfaces, the friction that is created grinds and effectively ruptures the cell. This method is most effectively paired with solid samples like plant tissue frozen in liquid nitrogen. (2)
  3. High Pressure Homogenization (HPH): High pressure homogenizers push the sample through a narrow space while multiple forces (e.g. intensive pressure, cavitation, turbulence) act on it to decrease particle size and rupture cells. This method works for a wide range of sample sizes, and is easily scalable.
  4. Ultrasonic Homogenization: Based on the force of cavitation, ultrasonic homogenization incorporates sound waves that create alternating high and low pressure cycles. Like HPH, ultrasonic techniques can be appropriate for any sample size and may be scaled if necessary.

BEE International: Homogenizers That Effectively Disrupt Cells

Listed above is just a small sampling of the more commonly used cell disruption techniques; of the many to select from, HPH is a viable and effective option. Not only can its techniques be scaled to any sample size, but its settings are also customizable to most cell types. On determining which homogenizer will be the best fit, the search can begin with BEE International Technology. We are globally recognized among laboratory managers and researchers for our high quality products and excellent customer support.

Cell lysis is just one of a variety of applications for BEEI homogenizers; nano/micro emulsions, lipids, suspensions, and dispersions are also easily achievable. Additionally, the homogenizer processes can be controlled to suit any given product, which will allow for customization to the cell type. And finally, the equipment is easy to use, produces higher yield in less time, and achieves results that are reproducible and scalable.

Learn more about how to effectively lyse your cell sample by contacting BEE International today. For more information on factors you should be considering when choosing a cell lysis method, download our FREE eBook: 

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Topics: Cell Lysis

All You Need to Know About Microorganism Homogenization

Posted by Deb Shechter on May 24, 2016 12:30:00 PM

Microorganism HomogenizationMicroorganisms like fungi, yeast, and bacteria comprise the vast majority of living things on Earth. Their contents are also key to research in most industries, meaning that effective disruption of their walls is of high interest to scientists and researchers. Below is a guide to effective disruption for each of the major types of microorganisms.

Fungus

With tough cell walls protecting valuable intracellular components, hydrolytic enzyme treatment is an effective first step. However, the diversity of fungal species means that a single mixing technique will not work for every organism. The most reliable method, therefore, is a homogenization process that is customizable; the user can then troubleshoot to find an optimal setting for any given fungal species. (1)

Yeast

As with fungi, yeast disruption can be initiated through the action of hydrolytic enzymes. The most widely used method for yeast cells is agitation with glass beads, although the breakage yield can be as low as 50%. High pressure homogenization is a feasible alternative that uses high pressure, rather than heat, to achieve a more sufficient percentage of cells lysed. (2)

Bacteria/Mycobacteria

When trying to isolate nucleic acids, bacteria can be easily disrupted with simple enzyme/detergent treatment. Gram negative bacterium may only require detergent exposure and not prior enzyme treatment, as compared with Gram positive bacterium that require both enzymes and detergent. When working with a new sample, it is therefore important to always troubleshoot the most effective method. For isolation of proteins or other intracellular contents, other methods like homogenization will be more appropriate.

Algae

Algal oil is enclosed within algae cells, and can be used for production of biofuels and other environmentally-friendly products. As with the above microorganisms, the intracellular components of an algae cell are protected by a rigid cell wall. Many scientists who work with algal oil use high pressure homogenization to effectively rupture its cells; this technique is particularly beneficial in its ability to be easily scaled.

BEE International: Homogenizers That Effectively Disrupt Cells

Researchers who require lysates from microorganisms should have a laboratory homogenizer available. On determining which homogenizer will be right for your lab, begin your search with BEE International Technology. We are globally recognized among laboratory managers and researchers for our high quality products and excellent customer support. Cell lysis is just one of a variety of applications for BEEI homogenizers; nano/micro emulsions, lipids, suspensions, and dispersions are also easily achievable. Additionally, the homogenizer processes can be controlled to suit your product, which will allow you to customize to your cell type. And finally, the equipment is easy to use, produces higher yield in less time, and achieves results that are reproducible and scalable.

Learn more about how to effectively lyse your microorganism sample by contacting us here! If you are looking for more information about cell lysis methods and how to choose the right one, download our FREE eBook here: 

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Topics: Homogenization

Cell Lysis: Which Method is Best?

Posted by Tal Shechter on May 23, 2016 12:30:00 PM

cell lysis methodsTissue preparation is an incredibly common process on the road to working with cell lysates and intracellular molecules. The lysis process, however, varies depending on cell type, molecule of interest, and equipment access, as airing an experiment with its appropriate lysis method can help to accomplish valuable data. Below is a breakdown of common lysis methods- how each works and important pros/cons to consider.

Chemical Disruption

Chemical lysis works through the actions of detergents, which disrupt the hydrophilic and hydrophobic interactions within the cell wall and membrane. The chemical composition of each detergent allows it to effectively disrupt specific cell types, depending on their biochemical properties. Although ideal for small samples, scaling a chemical disruption method can be financially draining.

Enzyme Treatment

Enzyme treatment can be highly effective for applications like breaking down cell walls, promoting DNA isolation, generating protoplasts, and removing unwanted contaminants. The type of enzyme used is determined by its intended use; for example, proteases like trypsin and collagenase can release individual cells from tissue, while cellulases can yield protoplasts from plant cells. Although useful specifically for its ability to produce an uncontaminated lysate, as with chemical disruption, enzyme treatment can be rather costly to scale. (1)

Grinding

Used most frequently with solid samples, mechanical (as opposed to the chemical methods listed above) grinding is achieved through the sliding of one or both surfaces enclosing a sample. The friction caused by this process can effectively rupture cells, which are oftentimes frozen ahead of time. For example, plant tissues frozen in liquid nitrogen, even with their rigid walls, can be effectively disrupted by the dual forces of pressure and shear. (2) While a mortar and pestle is the best-known grinding tool, other options such as glass homogenizers and grain mills also exist. (3)

High Pressure Homogenization

As with grinding, high pressure homogenization uses mechanical force to effectively lyse cells. Specifically, it uses intensive pressure along with forces like turbulence and cavitation to lyse a sufficient percentage of cells in an impressive 1-2 passes. This method is well-matched with diverse species like bacteria and fungus, which may require distinct processes; because some homogenizers are customizable, one machine could potentially work for multiple species.

BEEI: Homogenizers That Effectively Disrupt Cells

Researchers who require cell lysates, DNA, RNA, or protein extract should have access to a high pressure homogenizer. On determining which homogenizer will be the best fit, the search can begin with BEE International Technology. We are globally recognized among laboratory managers and researchers for our high quality products and excellent customer support.

Cell lysis is just one of a variety of applications for BEEI homogenizers; nano/micro emulsions, lipids, suspensions, and dispersions are also easily achievable. Additionally, the homogenizer processes can be controlled to suit any given product, which will allow for customization to the cell type. And finally, the equipment is easy to use, produces higher yield in less time, and achieves results that are reproducible and scalable.

Learn more about how to effectively lyse your cell sample by contacting us today. If you want more information on factors you should be considering when choosing a cell lysis method, download our FREE eBook today: 

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Topics: Cell Lysis

How to Achieve Stable Oil-in-Water Emulsions

Posted by David Shechter on May 20, 2016 12:00:00 PM

Oil-in-Water EmulsionsOil-in-water (o/w) emulsions are found in a plethora of products, from moisturizers to topical steroid products; the most well-known product, homogenized milk, hails from the food & beverage industry. Thicker than lotion and easier to spread than ointments, o/w-based creams work by penetrating the wall of the skin’s stratum corneum to achieve a local effect. But how to produce this valuable component, particularly one that will be stable enough to last for more than a few days? Below we describe specific ways to achieve a stable o/w emulsion, which can be used to create a product that will out-compete its competitors.

Preparation

Of course, there’s the given- an o/w emulsion absolutely requires oil droplets suspended in water. Not so obvious are the supportive components it must be prepared with. For example, all emulsions, whether o/w or water-in-oil (w/o), require an emulsifier to provide them with enhanced stability. O/w emulsions optimally incorporate more than one emulsifier because of their generally unstable chemical nature. A variety of emulsifiers exist to suit this function; polysorbate, sorbitan laurate, and cetearyl alcohol are some examples of o/w-compatible emulsifiers. To protect the stability of your emulsion, you can take one of a few steps before and/or during its production process. The emulsifier used, as indicated above, will help to stabilize an emulsion by breaking up droplets, organizing the particles, and adhering to smaller particles. The formulation of each emulsifier, as well as the combination of emulsifiers you select, will play a huge role in the final product’s stability.

Equipment

Emulsion production requires some form of mixing equipment, as it is the vigorous mixing action that allows oil and water to mix. Specifically, it is important to look for mixers that can apply high pressure along with mechanical forces. For example, high pressure homogenizers are touted for using both intensive pressure and forces like impact, cavitation, and adjustable process intensity to achieve a high quality formulation. Additionally (and importantly), look for a machine that can impart high shear. High shear overcomes the resistance oil and water have to mixing, and provides long-term stability that lower shear mixers cannot achieve. (1)

BEE: The Homogenizer Advantage

Emulsion production involves high pressure mixing, most commonly in the form of homogenization. Homogenization is the preferable method due to its ability to reduce particle sizes more significantly than other blending/emulsification methods. The first step in synthesizing a w/o or o/w emulsion is purchasing equipment that will achieve small and consistent particle size distribution. One such example is the high pressure homogenizer by BEE International Technology. Our products are trusted by researchers and lab managers around the world for key benefits, such as production of nano/micro emulsions, dispersions, and suspensions; importantly, this equipment can achieve consistent particle sizes at or below 100 nm, a key benefit for researchers & corporations that synthesize pharmaceutical products.

In addition, BEEI has extensive experience assisting its product users as they transition through the drug development process, a booming industry for emulsion production. Our homogenizers are differentiated for R&D, clinical trials, and manufacturing, and our customer support is reliable, experience-driven, and effective.

Learn more about how BEEI can enhance your emulsion production process by contacting us today! Also, if you are looking into particle size reduction and want more information, download our FREE eBook on how to achieve efficient and consistent particle size reduction

 

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The Forces Behind High Pressure Homogenization

Posted by David Shechter on May 16, 2016 3:30:00 PM

Forces_Behind_High_Pressure_Homogenization.jpgHigh pressure homogenization is touted as a premier method for reducing particle size, rupturing cell membranes, and creating products like emulsions and suspensions. Yet how is it different from other homogenization methods? Of course, its name tips off the fact that intensive pressure is a key driving force. Yet pressure alone could not achieve particles diameters of below 100 nm and consistent/uniform outcomes. It is the action of multiple forces in combination with pressure that allow for such impressive results in only one to two passes. Keep reading to gain a better understanding of each of the forces behind high pressure homogenization.

  • Turbulent Premixing

Before homogenization, high pressure machines like stirrers and agitators will put the sample through something called turbulent premixing. This prepares the sample by mechanically loosening bonds, thereby making the actual homogenization process easier and more time efficient.

  • Cavitation

Cavitation is thought of as a phenomenon that can occur when a high amount of pressure is exerted on a liquid sample; in plain terms, it forms liquid-free spaces within a liquid solution. Pressure allows the liquid to achieve high kinetic energy, which in turn increases velocity. This force is particularly desirable in particle size reduction, and can be found in machinery like sonic mixers and high pressure homogenizers. (1)

  • Impact

Most frequently found in bead mills, mpact is vital to reducing the size of solid particles suspended in a liquid suspension. Although bead mills are actually made to lyse difficult-to-disrupt cells, particularly those with cell walls, the force of impact allows them to also effectively reduce particle size.

  • High Shear

Shear force can be created when a tangential force is applied to a sample. This is particularly beneficial when dispersions are required, as high-shear mixers and homogenizers are able to effectively mix two immiscible phases (e.g. water-in-oil or oil-in-water emulsions). Although high-shear mixers are an option in terms of technique, high pressure homogenizers can actually achieve higher shear than these specialized equipment.

  • Operating Pressure

Key to the workings of a high pressure homogenizer, operating pressure is exerted as the sample is being pushed through a narrow space. This allows for enhanced action of other forces, as well as for increased ability to rupture tough cell walls. High quality equipment should be able to achieve a maximum operating pressure of approximately 3100 bars.

BEEI: Homogenizer Equipment Recommendation

As you hunt for particle size reduction equipment that will suit your lab’s purposes, consider how the above-listed factors will improve the quality of your products. Although many companies manufacture homogenizers, few offer the multiple mechanical forces needed to achieve reliable and reproducible results. One example of equipment that does meet such expectations is the high pressure homogenizer by BEE International Technology.

BEE’s products are trusted by researchers and lab managers around the world for key benefits, such as production of nano/micro emulsions, dispersions, and suspensions; importantly, this equipment can achieve consistent particle sizes at or below 100 nm, a key benefit for researchers & corporations across a wide variety of industries.

Learn more about BEE’s particle size reduction equipment here.

To understand how consistent particle sizes occur during reduction, download our FREE eBook today: 

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Topics: High Pressure, Homogenization

High-Pressure vs. Liquid Homogenization: Which to Use?

Posted by Tal Shechter on May 13, 2016 12:30:00 PM

High-Pressure_vs._Liquid_Homogenization-_Which_to_Use_.jpgTwo widely used techniques- liquid homogenization and high pressure homogenization- have similar outcomes, yet distinct processes. So when you are looking to create a homogenous mixture, reduce particle size, or lyse cells, how will you know which is preferable? Here we delve into critical similarities and differences between the liquid mixer and high pressure homogenizer.

Liquid Homogenization

Widely used for small volumes and cultured cells, liquid homogenization requires that a sample is manually forced through a narrow space, thereby shearing membranes and decreasing particle size. Three different types of are primarily used; these are the Dounce homogenizer, Potter-Elvehjem homogenizer, and the French press. The liquid homogenization technique is beneficial in its ability to effectively lyse cells in only one to two passes; however, its small volume requirement (typically up to 250 mL) only allows for experimental laboratory use and not scaling to manufacturing. (1)

High Pressure Homogenization

High pressure homogenization, similar to liquid homogenization, forces a sample through a narrow space; yet instead of the manual requirement of liquid homogenizers, high pressure homogenizers run automatically. This process uses multiple mechanical forces (such as turbulence, cavitation, and shear) along with intensive pressure to achieve micronization and membrane lysis. Because of its intensive pressure, high pressure homogenization can tackle cells with tough exterior walls (e.g. bacteria, yeast, fungus). Additionally, high pressure homogenizers are oftentimes made to be scaled from laboratory experimentation up to manufacturing.

BEE: Trustworthy High-Pressure Homogenizers

The product you select for your laboratory will ultimately depend on its downstream applications and the cell types being used. Either way, you will be well-served to select a homogenizer that is flexible to meet the various needs of a laboratory. There are plenty of companies on the market to select equipment from; however, the product can be of higher quality and more even consistency when run through top-shelf equipment, most frequently in the form of a homogenizer.

BEE International Technologies is trusted by researchers around the world for both their laboratory homogenizers and their associated customer support. Particle size reduction is just one of a variety of applications for BEE homogenizers; nano/micro emulsions, lipids, suspensions, cell lysis and dispersions are also easily achievable. Additionally, the homogenizer processes can be controlled to suit your product, which will allow you to customize to your cell type. And finally, the equipment is easy to use, produces higher yield in less time, and achieves results that are reproducible and scalable.

Learn about how BEE’s products can maximize your homogenization processes by contacting us today. If you are interested in more information on the Advantages of BEE Homogenizers for the Pharmaceutical Industry, download our FREE eBook: 

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Topics: High Pressure, Liquid Homogenization

Tissue Homogenization: 4 Viable Techniques

Posted by Deb Shechter on May 12, 2016 3:30:00 PM

Brooke_Callan_brooke.callanleapclixx.com_Tissue_Homogenization-_4_Viable_Techniques.jpgTissue homogenization is performed regularly in labs across the world for cell and tissue preparation. This process involves lysing the cells to release intracellular contents of interest, such as proteins and nuclear components. Scientists can measure the efficacy of a homogenization technique by its time efficiency combined with its overall ability to create a high-quality sample. Here we analyze four different tissue homogenization techniques for their ideal cell types, batch sizes, and potential benefits/caveats.

  • Chemical Homogenization

Most disruption methods use some form of lysis buffer or chemical to provide stability when isolating specific biomolecules. Yet some chemicals can be used alone to effectively homogenize tissues. For example, surfactants and detergents target biological membranes by disrupting the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface, and are well-matched with various bacterial species. Enzymes also tackle the cell membrane and/or wall, and can be effectively used as a first step in obtaining tissue extract. Chemical homogenization is preferable for small samples, as the materials cost can become overwhelming for industrial-sized products. (1)

  • Freeze-Thawing

Frequently employed to disrupt bacterial and mammalian cells, freeze-thawing is nearly as simple as it sounds. A tissue suspension is first frozen and then thawed at room temperature. Ice crystals that formed during the freezing process contract as the sample thaws, which ruptures the cell’s membrane. Although it effectively releases recombinant cytoplasmic proteins, the freeze-thaw process requires multiple cycles and requires significant amounts of time. (2)

  • Mechanical Homogenization

Encompassing equipment like rotor stators and high pressure homogenizers, mechanical homogenization works by using pressure and/or force(s), instead of heat, to mechanically disrupt cells. Scientists often turn to this technique because of its ability to be easily scaled, as well as its quick process and uniform/consistent results.

  • Ultrasonic Homogenization

Ultrasonic homogenizers, also known as sonicators, rupture tissues through a combination of cavitation and ultrasonic waves. This technique is ideally matched for suspended cellular/subcellular structures, as well as for shearing DNA. However, because it generates a significant amount of heat, ultrasonic homogenization is only appropriate for tissues and molecules that will not be affected by temperature increase. (3)

BEE International: The Homogenizer Advantage

Use of high quality tissue homogenization equipment will provide numerous benefits for both production laboratories and consumers alike. And there are plenty of companies on the market to select your equipment from. However, the homogenate can be of higher quality and more even consistency when run through top-shelf equipment, most frequently in the form of a high pressure homogenizer. BEE International Technology is trusted by researchers and lab managers around the world. We deliver an array of key benefits, such as production of nano/micro emulsions and dispersions and lipids and suspensions; these can be used for applications such as injectables, targeted drug delivery, inhalants, time release, anesthetics, and importantly, vaccinations.

In addition, we have extensive experience in the challenges that our customers face as they transition from concept, through to R&D, clinical trials, all-important FDA approval and finally, to manufacturing.

Learn more about how our high pressure homogenizers can benefits your tissue homogenization, contact us today. Or if you're interested in reading more about cell rupture and cell disruption, download our FREE eBook below:

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Topics: Cell Lysis, Homogenization, Homogenizer

What to Look for When Buying a Homogenizer

Posted by Tal Shechter on May 9, 2016 11:58:00 AM

what-to-look-for-when-buying-a-homogenizer.jpgMixing equipment for laboratory and commercial use is a big business that has continued growing since the advent of the blender in the early 1900s. Intensive mixers are now a critical component of most successful laboratories. That said, mixers can come in many different shapes and sizes. Homogenizers are one of the more powerful and commonly used types, yet even under this umbrella are many model options. Here we tackle specific components/factors to look for when buying a homogenizer, so that you can land with a useful and effective machine.

Multiple Mechanical Forces

The majority of mixing equipment on the market contains a single mechanical force, such as shear or pressure. However, scientists and researchers continue to see that more forces applied to a sample equates to more intensive mixing, enhanced micronization, increased emulsion stability, and better dispersion of ingredients. Look for a machine that offers multiple mechanical forces like cavitation, turbulence, and flow.

Quality of Technical & Customer Support

It is important to know that support is helpful and customer-centered, particularly once you begin optimizing processes on your future equipment. Training and installation should help customers feel comfortable with both the equipment and processes, so as to maximize its usage; in addition, many manufacturers provide technical support via phone and/or Skype. As you browse homogenizer manufacturers, be sure to ask about their support, as their answer will give you insight into the experience you may have with them.

Scalability

Whether your homogenizer will work for the beverage, pharmaceutical, biotech, or chemical industry (among many others), it should be scalable. As you develop and bring new products to manufacturing, you want to have equipment already in place that supports this already intimidating transition to larger batches. Having scalable equipment from the get-go confers increased cost savings, decreased time requirement, and an overall higher likelihood for product success. Some companies specifically make their homogenizers to be scalable, and these are the ones you should seek out.

BEE International: High Pressure Homogenizers Worth Selecting

Have you decided that a pressure homogenizer will be the right choice for you? Begin your search with laboratory homogenizers with BEE International (BEE). BEE is trusted by researchers and lab managers around the world. We deliver an array of key benefits, such as production of cell lysates, nano/micro emulsions and dispersions and lipids and suspensions. Our homogenizer processes can be controlled to better suit your product; for example, pressure can be adjusted to be gentler or harsher and the results can be scaled to manufacturing. Finally, our equipment is easy to use, produces higher yield in less time, and results are reproducible and scalable.

BEE offers a variety of laboratory, pilot-plant, and industrial scale models that can help you achieve high quality applications. Learn more about BEE and our homogenizer options by contacting us today or if you're interested in learning how BEE homogenizers benefit the pharmaceutical industry, download our FREE eBook below:

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Topics: Homogenizer

Production of Cosmetic Creams & Lotion: Why Homogenize?

Posted by David Shechter on May 6, 2016 1:00:00 PM

production-of-cosmetic-creams-lotion-why-homogenize.jpgIn 2010, Americans spent an impressive $33.3 billion on cosmetic & beauty products, up nearly 6% from the prior year (and continues rising past 2010). (1) A huge percentage of that value comes from creams and lotions that both men and women use on a daily basis. Companies trying to break into this multi-billion dollar, cutthroat market must therefore produce a cream/lotion that is more effective than that of competitors. High pressure homogenization is a preferred method of production for a variety of reasons; keep reading to better understand how this technique can improve your cosmetic cream or lotion.

Effective Particle Size Reduction

High pressure homogenization works by forcing a sample through a narrow space while imparting high pressure and multiple mechanical forces (e.g. turbulence, cavitation, shear). Because most other methods only impart a single mechanical force, high pressure homogenization is desirable for its ability to more effectively decrease particle size. Micronization is a desirable outcome for not just creams and lotions, but all cosmetic products, because of its significant effect on product quality. For example, it creates a more homogenous mixture, provides better active ingredient dispersion, and stabilizes the product emulsions (as described below).

Enhanced Texture & Consistency

For the skin to be able to absorb them, beauty creams and moisturizing lotions must have both the right texture and consistency. High pressure homogenization is recognized for its ability to create a uniformly mixed product, leading to smoother texture and better consistency than other mixing methods. Micronization ties in here, in that better droplet reduction contributes to product uniformity.

Increased Emulsion Stability

Semi-solid products like lotions and creams are comprised of emulsions, or mixtures of two immiscible liquids. Droplet micronization (as indicated above) can eliminate separation of the water phase, allowing for a more permanent mixture of oil and water. This can both extend the product’s shelf life and improve physical appearance by ensuring consistency in coloring.

BEEI: Homogenizers For High Quality Cosmetic Products

On the quest for a cosmetic homogenizer, it is important to select a high-quality model. Whether your product of interest is a cream, lotion, makeup, or personal care item, a high pressure homogenizer that is both highly capable and customizable will enhance its effectiveness. Start your search with BEE International, globally renowned for our laboratory homogenizers.

Contact us today if you're interested in learning how our technology can benefit your cosmetic application! Or if you're interested in learning more information on how to achieve efficient and consistent particle size reduction, download our FREE eBook now:

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Topics: Cosmetic

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