BEE International Blog

3 Advantages of High Pressure Homogenizers for Drug Research & Development

Posted by David Shechter on Jul 29, 2016 12:30:00 PM

high pressure homogenizationFor the millions of people battling disease in America, medical innovation is what helps patients live longer, more active lives. Yet innovation begins far from the consumer shelf, as a basic idea developed in a small laboratory or office. When researchers decide to push forward with this idea, it enters the drug research and development (R&D) process, where its synthesis method is optimized. On comparison of the resulting experimental methods, one would see that a large proportion involve homogenization, specifically using high pressure. Keep reading to better understand the advantages of high pressure homogenization for R&D, and ultimately for disease prevention and treatment.

  1. Reduction of particle size to enhance chemical and physical qualities. So many of the pharmaceutical products we are exposed to are synthesized through particle size reduction- vaccines, vaccine adjuvants, nutraceuticals, and antibiotics are just a few of the more recognizable titles. Homogenizer technology is one of few that can achieve both small particle size and uniform consistency, which benefits products by increasing bioavailability and chemical stability, as well as enhancing physical appearance.
  2. Improved API delivery. The active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) contained within pharmaceutical products must be treated sensitively, as changes in factors like heat and pH can cause irreversible API delivery. Mixing processes using heat should therefore be avoided; high pressure homogenizers, in contrast, use force as opposed to heat, which preserves the API and increases its bioavailability. Another contributing factor is the ability of homogenizers to reduce particle size (as indicated above). Smaller particles are more easily digested, which also contributes to this better API distribution.
  3. Better scaling for drug development. The drug development process contains many hurdles, too high for most products in the R&D stage to overcome. However, for those products that do enter clinical trials and beyond, their success largely depends on the scalability of the equipment being used. While many mixing methods exist, the scalable homogenizer can increase cost savings, lower time requirements, and decrease the product’s likelihood of failure.

BEE International: High-Quality Pharmaceutical Homogenizers

As your potential product moves through the drug development process, it will need to prove its value in both safety and effectiveness to even get to the manufacturing stage of drug development; this can be accomplished by utilizing high quality equipment in the R&D phase, clinical trials, and again in the manufacturing phase.

BEE International Technology produces homogenizers that can yield a variety of relevant products, such as emulsions, suspensions, dispersions and lipids. Importantly, these products go on to make up the injectables, inhalants, anesthetics, and vaccinations that attain FDA approval for manufacturing. In addition, BEEI has extensive experience assisting its product users as they transition through the drug development process.

To learn more about how their homogenizers can optimize your drug’s chances of success, contact us today. 

For more information on homogenization, cell lysis, and how to choose the right method for you, download our FREE eBook: 

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Topics: High Pressure, Homogenization

4 Things You Need to Know About Microbial Cell Homogenization

Posted by Tal Shechter on Jul 28, 2016 12:30:00 PM

homogenizationMicrobial cells are used by researchers around the world, every single day. Their simple forms, ability to grow quickly in vitro, and ease in experimentation makes them ideal candidates for the job. Disruption of these cells, while not comparatively complicated, can feel so when using a new process and machinery. To help even the inexperienced user navigate the world of microbial homogenization, below are some key tips to bear in mind. (1) Happy homogenization!

  • There is no universally optimized design. As easy as it would be to find a single experimental design and homogenizer system that work for every application, that is not necessarily a reality. When shopping around for homogenizer systems it is important to seek out one that is both scalable and customizable; this will allow the user much more flexibility in its use.
  • Cell analysis requires specific microscope access. Analysis of the homogenate will require a microscope, specifically one with phase-contrast options and a spectrophotometer. A scientist can thus use a dye-binding assay with the spectrophotometer, which measures protein release concentration, to determine the level of disruption.
  • Analysis of the homogenate should occur as soon as possible. Of course, contamination is an increasing risk as a bacterial sample sits out longer. But just as importantly, after disruption, viable cells that linger in the broth may reproduce using substrates recycled from disrupted cells.
  • Cleanability of the homogenizer should be carefully considered. If not cleaned properly after use, a homogenizer can provide the grounds for contamination of future samples. As such, a machine’s cleanability should be considered; specifically, it should be easy to perform regular maintenance and users should be diligent about following the manufacturer’s recommended maintenance schedule. Additionally, users should determine if they are comfortable with a product that requires disassembly.

BEE International: Homogenizers That Effectively Disrupt Cells

High pressure homogenization (HPH) is the most commonly used method for microbial cell disruption due largely to its effectiveness at the medium and large scale. Not only can its techniques be scaled to any sample size, but its settings are also customizable to most cell types. On determining which homogenizer will be the best fit, the search can begin with BEE International Technology. We are globally recognized among laboratory managers and researchers for their high quality products and excellent customer support.

Cell lysis is just one of a variety of applications for our homogenizers; nano/micro emulsions, lipids, suspensions, and dispersions are also easily achievable. Additionally, the homogenizer processes can be controlled to suit any given product, which will allow for customization to the cell type. And finally, the equipment is easy to use, produces higher yield in less time, and achieves results that are reproducible and scalable.

Learn more about how to effectively lyse your cell sample by contacting us today. 

For more information about particle size reduction and how to get efficient and consistent results, download our FREE eBook:

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Topics: Homogenization

Alkaline Lysis vs. High Pressure Homogenization: Which Lyses More Efficiently?

Posted by David Shechter on Jul 26, 2016 12:30:00 PM

high pressure homogenizationDNA isolation is central to all types of biological experimentation, in that the molecule’s ability to provide defining criteria of any organism is indispensable. The first steps in the multi-isolation process involve extracting tissue and then isolating lysing cells; these ensure access to nuclear molecules, and with proper treatment, prevent the action of any enzyme that might destroy the molecules of interest. As lysis can be accomplished via a multitude of methods, here we dissect the better (more efficient) option between two that are commonly invoked: alkaline lysis and high pressure homogenization.

Alkaline lysis is largely preferred for extracting plasmid DNA from bacteria. A user would first start by growing and harvesting bacteria containing the plasmid of interest, and would follow by pelleting the cells and re-suspending them in a Tris/EDTA (or other such) solution. Lysis follows when a buffer containing NaOH and detergent is added, and the process concludes with the addition of potassium acetate to reduce the mixture’s alkalinity. (1) This method can be used for a range of sample sizes, but can be be a more costly path due to the high value of some reagents.

In contrast to that of alkaline lysis, the cell types that can be run through a high pressure homogenizer are many. From mammalian cells that only have a flexible membrane protecting intracellular contents to the bacteria and plants that also have tough cell walls, the customization option of a high pressure homogenizer allows it to accommodate each. Samples are lysed after being forced through a narrow space while being exposed to pressure, shear, and other mechanical forces. Well-suited for scaling from laboratory testing to commercial production, this method can be used for any sample size.

Ultimately, the decision to use alkaline lysis or high pressure homogenization will come down to the downstream application and other potential uses. For example, while alkaline lysis does a terrific job at lysing a single cell type well, high pressure homogenization caters to an array of cell types. So someone interested in lysing more than just bacteria may be safer with a high pressure homogenizer. Either way, it is important to conduct further research on each option to ensure a well-informed decision.

BEE International: The Homogenizer Advantage

Use of high quality cell lysis equipment will provide numerous benefits for both production laboratories and consumers alike. And there are plenty of companies on the market to select your equipment from. However, the lysate can be of higher quality and more even consistency when run through top-shelf equipment, most frequently in the form of a high pressure homogenizer. BEE International Technology is trusted by researchers and lab managers around the world. We deliver an array of key benefits, such as production of nano/micro emulsions and dispersions and lipids and suspensions; these can be used for applications such as injectables, targeted drug delivery, inhalants, time release, anesthetics, and importantly, vaccinations.

In addition, we have extensive experience in the challenges that our customers face as they transition from concept, through to R&D, clinical trials, all-important FDA approval and finally, to manufacturing. Learn more by contacting us today. 

For more information about cell lysis methods and factors you should consider when choose a method, download our FREE eBook:

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Topics: Cell Lysis, Homogenization

How Do Intensifier Pumps Work in Homogenizers?

Posted by Tal Shechter on Jul 25, 2016 12:30:00 PM

intensifier pumps in homogenizersThe intensifier pump was developed as a solution to a major homogenizer problem. Homogenizers are now known to be effective due to the high pressure they can exert on a sample, yet this wasn’t always the case. In many cases, the input pressure of a system is low because the oft-used flexible tubing is not reinforced, which creates an upper limit on how much pressure can be applied. And although the output requires high pressure, without an intensifier, there is no way to safely increase pressure at this point. An intensifier pump provides a safe means with which to amplify a system’s pressure, despite low input pressure, and then transmit it to the output. (1) Only through an understanding of homogenization and the role of intensifier pumps in the process can a user take full advantage of what they have to offer.

Homogenizers are a form of mixing equipment that contribute to numerous applications; in particular, they are well-known for their ability to decrease particle size. This application has hefty weight across industries, as small droplets and the emulsions created by them contribute to formation of homogenized milk, pharmaceutical medications (in both tablet and syrup form), biofuels, carbon nanotubes, and more. Intensifier pumps allow for further decreases in droplet size, as higher pressure equates to small droplet size.

BEE Internationl, a well-recognized homogenizer manufacturer, incorporates proprietary intensifiers into their homogenizers. The intensifier pump is comprised of three major sections, each of which contributes to a common goal. The hydraulic cylinder takes in pressurized oil and pushes a hydraulic piston, which causes the piston to push back. The hydraulic cylinder is held together with a high-pressure cylinder by an object called an isolator, which also prevents cross-contamination between hydraulic fluid and product fluid. And finally, the high-pressure cylinder takes in product from the inlet port and pushes it out to the EC during a power stroke of the pump.

The intensifier pump’s actions should not be minimized; it is because of this technology that allows the products indicated above to attain desired traits. For example, small droplet size contributes to product stability and, with foods and beverages, increased shelf life. With pharmaceutical products, this quality translates to increased bioavailability of active ingredients. And with any product, smoother texture and more uniform distribution of ingredients are to be expected.

BEE International: The Homogenizer Advantage

On determining which homogenizer will be right for your lab, begin your search with BEE International Technology. We are globally recognized among laboratory managers and researchers for their high quality products and excellent customer support. Particle size reduction is just one of a variety of applications for our homogenizers; nano/micro emulsions, cell lysis, lipids, suspensions, and dispersions are also easily achievable. Additionally, the homogenizer processes can be controlled to suit your product, which allows for customization to each cell type. And finally, the equipment is easy to use, produces higher yield in less time, and achieves results that are reproducible and scalable.

Learn more about how BEE homogenizers can improve your experimentation by contacting us today.

For more information about cell lysis methods and how to choose the right one for you, download our FREE eBook:

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Topics: Homogenization

Homogenizers for Emulsion Synthesis: What to Look for When Buying

Posted by David Shechter on Jul 22, 2016 12:30:00 PM

homogenizersDetermining which criteria are important to you is one of the first key steps on the path to purchasing a homogenizer. Because there is a huge variety of models and options on the market, it is important to go in knowing what you are looking for and why. Below is a list of essential factors to look for when buying a homogenizer, specifically through the lens of emulsion applications.

Presence of multiple forces, particularly shear

The chemistry that causes resistance between two particles needs to be overcome to finely disperse droplets. Homogenizers typically have high shear, which is ideal for overcoming this resistance; potential buyers should also seek out a machine that incorporates more than one force to further decrease droplet size and enhance long-term stability.

Scalable machines that preserves product stability

For any given product, all conditions must remain the same through scale-up. And although laboratory optimization of the formulation is not necessarily difficult, significant troubleshooting may be needed to attain the same level of stability in larger machines. Homogenizers that are made to be scalable typically have the ability to adjust variables to, for example, increase the intensity of forces. This critical trait allows the product an emulsion is incorporated within to be scaled to manufacturing as a stable entity. (1)

Ability to customize variables

Tied closely with laboratory optimization and scaling is the customization capability of a homogenizer. Machines that allow a user to customize variables like temperature and intensity of forces can save an incredible amount of time, as well as money linked to materials that are used during optimization.

BEE International: The Homogenizer Advantage

Emulsion production involves high pressure mixing, with homogenization as the most popular method for its ability to reduce particle sizes more significantly than other blending/emulsification methods. The first step in synthesizing an emulsion is purchasing equipment that will achieve small and consistent particle size distribution. One such example is the high pressure homogenizer by BEE International Technology. Our products are trusted by pharmaceutical researchers and lab managers around the world for key benefits, such as production of nano/micro emulsions, dispersions, and suspensions; importantly, this equipment can achieve consistent particle sizes at or below 100 nm, a key benefit for researchers & corporations that synthesize pharmaceutical products.

In addition, we have extensive experience assisting its product users as they transition through the drug development process. Our homogenizers are differentiated for R&D, clinical trials, and manufacturing, and our customer support is reliable, experience-driven, and effective.

Learn more about how BEEI can enhance your emulsion production process by contacting us today. For more information about particle size reduction and how to achieve efficient and consistent results, download our FREE eBook:

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Topics: Homogenizer, Emulsions

Colloid Mills: How They Compare to High Pressure Homogenizers

Posted by David Shechter on Jul 18, 2016 12:30:00 PM

Colloid_Mills-_How_They_Compare_to_High_Pressure_Homogenizers.jpgSmall particles: The well-kept secret to how our cosmetic products work well. And our chemical products. And our pharmaceutical drugs. And our preserved food...you get the point. The list could keep going, but the point is easily driven home. Particle size reduction, the process that creates small particles, can be achieved in numerous ways; yet it is in the best interest of the manufacturers hailing from these numerous industries to find the best process. The colloid mill and high pressure homogenizer both have the ability to reduce particle size, yet are different in some critical ways. Keep reading to better understand the differences between using a colloid mill or a high pressure homogenizer for particle size reduction.

Machine Process

The colloid mill classification as rotor-stator mixers means that they are comprised of a quickly rotating rotor, which draws a sample up. The sample then gets pushed in a centrifuge-like fashion through a stator, which contains many small slots. The combination of high rpm from the rotor and movement through the tiny slots causes the particles to be mechanically sheared. (1) In contrast, homogenization forces the sample through a narrow space while imparting multiple forces and high pressure to create a consistent and uniform sample.

Sample Composition

Both colloid mills and high pressure homogenizers can process liquid/solid combinations, e.g. the sample is comprised of a solid immersed in a liquid suspension or a liquid suspended in another liquid. Either machine can enhance the stability of these types of samples, and can also reduce the particle size of the suspended particles.

Suitable Applications

While colloid mills are only suitable for particle size reduction, high pressure homogenizers can be used for particle reduction and more. For example, the homogenizer’s ability to lyse cells stems from the powerful pressure that ruptures even difficult-to-break walls, like bacteria, yeast, and fungi. A variety of industries can benefit from access to either machine; these include the pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and food fields. Yet the homogenizer is also known to work within the chemical, medical, and biotechnology industries, while the colloid mill also benefits the paint, soap, textile, and paper industries.

BEE International: Trustworthy High-Pressure Homogenizers

The product you select for your laboratory will ultimately depend on its downstream applications and the cell types being used. Either way, you will be well-served to select a homogenizer that is flexible to meet the various needs of a laboratory. There are plenty of companies on the market to select equipment from; however, the product can be of higher quality and more even consistency when run through top-shelf equipment, most frequently in the form of a homogenizer.

BEE International Technologies is trusted by researchers around the world for both our laboratory homogenizers and our associated customer support. Particle size reduction is just one of a variety of applications for BEE homogenizers; nano/micro emulsions, lipids, suspensions, cell lysis and dispersions are also easily achievable. Additionally, the homogenizer processes can be controlled to suit your product, which will allow you to customize to your cell type. And finally, the equipment is easy to use, produces higher yield in less time, and achieves results that are reproducible and scalable.

Learn about how BEE’s products can maximize your homogenization processes by contacting us today. For more information on how to achieve efficient and consistent particle size reduction, download our FREE eBook:

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Topics: Particle Size Reduction

How Homogenizers Benefit the Drug Manufacturing Process

Posted by David Shechter on Jul 15, 2016 12:30:00 PM

homogenizers-and-drug-manufacturing-process.jpgThe drug development industry is a booming one; particularly as medical technology advances, the need for advanced preventative and reactive treatments continues to rise. Although innumerable drugs are developed during R&D, very few see the light of manufacturing. So when you develop a product that actually does make it out of clinical trials and to the consumer shelf, it is critical that your manufacturing technique yields a high-quality product; many drug companies elect to use homogenization for the manufacturing stage because of just that. But what specifically can a homogenizer, particularly industrial (manufacturing) machines contribute that other mixing methods can’t?

Effortless Scaling from R&D and Clinical Trials

As indicated above, the many difficulties associated with drug development results in a small proportion of products going beyond R&D. For these products that do make it to clinical trials and further, their success largely depends on the scalability of their synthesis technique. While many mixing methods exist, homogenization is comparatively more scalable and confers increased cost savings, lower time requirements, and higher likelihood of progression to manufacturing.

Enhanced Physical Qualities

Some pharmaceuticals, particularly liquids (e.g. syrups), require a specific treatment to ensure consistency. Although at least one thickening agent is usually present, these agents carry the risk of agglomeration, which can pose a significant hurdle to appealing physical appearance. While conventional mixing machines aren’t quite fit to disperse clumps, homogenizers combine force and mechanical pressure to overcome it by providing chemical stability. This quality also plays a significant role in determining shelf life, as pharmaceutical products are comprised of emulsions so separation is a risk. However, putting a potential product through homogenization during its manufacture can greatly lengthen its shelf life. (1)

Improved Mechanism of Action

Homogenizers are renowned for their ability to decrease particle size, as smaller droplets are easier for the digestive system to process. This increases bioavailability by promoting effective delivery of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). APIs contained in pharmaceutical products can be damaged by changes like heat and pH, so must be treated sensitively. Mixing processes using heat should therefore be avoided; however, because mechanical homogenizers use force as opposed to heat, their APIs are preserved and so have increased bioavailability. (2)

BEE International: High-Quality Pharmaceutical Homogenizers

As your potential product moves through the drug development process, it will need to prove its value in both safety and effectiveness to even get to the manufacturing stage of drug development; this can be accomplished by utilizing high quality equipment in the R&D phase, clinical trials, and again in the manufacturing phase.

BEE International Technology produces homogenizers that can yield a variety of relevant products, such as emulsions, suspensions, dispersions and lipids. Importantly, these products go on to make up the injectables, inhalants, anesthetics, and vaccinations that attain FDA approval for manufacturing. In addition, BEEI has extensive experience assisting its product users as they transition through the drug development process.

Visit BEEI here to learn more about how their homogenizers can optimize your drug’s chances of success. If you're interested in more information on how BEE's homogenizers can improve your pharmaceutical products, download our FREE eBook "Advantages of BEE Homogenizer for the Pharmaceutical Industry":

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Topics: Pharmaceutical, Homogenizer

Dounce Homogenizer: Better than High Pressure Homogenization?

Posted by Tal Shechter on Jul 13, 2016 12:30:00 PM

Dounce_HomogenizerMechanical homogenization is oftentimes preferable to other methods in its ability to impart physical change without altering the chemical properties of the sample. Cell lysis, an oft-visited homogenizer application, exemplifies this concept; while chemical disruption methods risk altering the intracellular molecules of interest, mechanical disruption methods simply cause a physical break in the membrane and/or wall while leaving subcellular fractions injury-free. Dounce homogenizers and high pressure homogenizers (HPH) can both be used to mechanically lyse cells, but which is better, particularly for your intended application?

The concept of homogenization was brought into existence in the 1800’s, when scientists began altering milk’s properties to improve its taste and physical appearance. The first homogenizer was patented in 1899 by Auguste Gaulin, and since then, this simple machine has evolved significantly. (1) The Dounce homogenizer and the HPH are great examples of this model because of their similar purpose and vast procedural difference. The Dounce homogenizer has a quite simple setup, in that it is comprised of a glass mortar and pestle with a miniscule clearance between the two, which allows for a stress-induced lysis of cells and tissues. In contrast, HPH forces a sample through a narrow tube while imparting multiple mechanical forces to rupture the cells. Although each is an effective method of homogenization, they  represent a distinct evolutionary lineage from the first homogenizer.

Aside from their basic mechanisms of action, Dounce homogenizers and HPH cater to a very different crowd. Firstly, the number of steps should be taken into consideration; an ideal technique has one single step and HPH generally meets this format. HPH simply requires setting of the dials for customization and entry of the sample into the machine. While the sample may require pre- or post-homogenization treatment, the homogenization process itself has that sweet spot of easy setup and a machine completing the work. On the opposing end, Dounce homogenization is one of multiple manual steps that are required to effectively lyse a cell. For example, a scientist would first cut tissue to isolate subcellular fractions, coarsely grind the sample, and then use a Dounce homogenizer for final rupture. (2) Moreover, Dounce homogenizers can process only small samples at a single time and require significant user participation with the mortar and pestle. HPH can process samples on both a small and large scale, making it more valuable to scientists.

BEE International: High Pressure Homogenizers That Effectively Disrupt Cells

Researchers who require cell lysates, DNA, RNA, or protein extract should have access to a high pressure homogenizer. On determining which homogenizer will be the best fit, the search can begin with BEE International Technology. We are globally recognized among laboratory managers and researchers for our high quality products and excellent customer support. Cell lysis is just one of a variety of applications for our homogenizers; nano/micro emulsions, lipids, suspensions, and dispersions are also easily achievable. Additionally, the homogenizer processes can be controlled to suit any given product, which will allow for customization to the cell type. And finally, the equipment is easy to use, produces higher yield in less time, and achieves results that are reproducible and scalable.

Learn more about how to effectively lyse your cell sample by contacting us today. Also, if you are looking for more information on cell lysis methods and how to choose the right one for you, download our FREE eBook: 

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Topics: Cell Lysis

3 Differences Between Oil-in-Water & Water-in-Oil Emulsions

Posted by Tal Shechter on Jul 12, 2016 12:30:00 PM

oil in water and water in oil emulsionsEmulsions are well-known systems within the pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and food industries for the properties that allow them to comprise numerous consumer products. Each of these products contains either a water-in-oil (w/o) or oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion. Regardless of the fact that both types are majorly made up of the same two compounds, each is distinct in its chemical properties, applications, and more; having an understanding of these differences will help you make a more informed selection for your own application. Read below for 3 specific differences between w/o and o/w emulsions.

  1. Suspended vs. continuous phase

Perhaps the most basic, but also the most significant, difference between o/w and w/o emulsions is which phase is suspended and which is continuous. Oil and water are normally immiscible, but with proper mixing and stability agents, a permanent mixture, or emulsion, can be achieved. O/w emulsions are comprised of oil droplets suspended in an aqueous phase, while w/o emulsions are the opposite- water droplets suspended in a continuous oil phase. Smaller droplet sizes will enhance the effectiveness of either system; this may translate to increased bioavailability in pharmaceutical products or extended shelf life in food/beverage products. Get more tips on how to create better and more stable emulsions by reading here!

  1. Type of product that can be created

The chemical nature of an o/w emulsion is distinct from that of a w/o emulsion; as such, each is most effectively used in different products. O/w emulsions are the basis of water-based products; in the pharmaceutical industry, they can be found in creams like moisturizers and topical steroid products. And homogenized milk is simply formed from the dispersal of fat droplets in an aqueous layer. In contrast, w/o emulsions make up oil-based products like sunscreen and most makeup. Additionally, its milder nature and ability to leave the skin’s lipid bilayer intact makes the w/o emulsion an ideal base for dry/sensitive skin treatments. 

  1. How to achieve stability

Stability is key when considering an emulsion synthesis technique; without it, the two phases will separate and the product will have lower function. All emulsions, whether w/o or o/w, require an emulsifier to assist with stability. O/w emulsions typically require more than one emulsifier, and they can be acquired separately or in a pre-mixed cocktail. Polysorbate, sorbitan laurate, and cetearyl alcohol are just a few examples of emulsifiers that are compatible with o/w emulsions. In contrast, while w/o emulsions only require one emulsifier, there is a limited number to select from because the hydrophilic balance must be in a narrow range (3-6). Sorbitan stearate, lecithin, lanolin/lanolin alcohols, and glyceryl monooleate are some examples of viable w/o emulsifiers. (1)

Which is a Better Fit for Your Application?

Your selection of either o/w or w/o emulsion will largely depend on the type of product you are making, which emulsifiers you have access to, and the equipment you have available. No matter which you choose, however, you will require a homogenizer to synthesize your emulsion. The homogenizer will shear fluid by forcing it through a restrictive valve, forming a high-quality emulsion. BEE International Technology offers homogenizers that are both high-quality and reliable, and which can help your lab produce nano/micro emulsions, dispersions, and suspensions to be incorporated into your pharmaceutical cream. Contact us today to learn more about our products.

For more information about particle size reduction and how to get efficient and consistent results, download our FREE eBook: 

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Topics: Emulsions

What is an Intensifier Pump and How Can It Help Homogenization?

Posted by David Shechter on Jul 11, 2016 12:30:00 PM

intensifier pump and homogenizationAs a researcher/scientist who uses (or may use) a homogenizer in experimental technique and product manufacturing, you can appreciate the value of a diverse and high-quality machine. BEE International (BEEI), a company which both designs and manufactures homogenizers, uses proprietary technology to elevate its products above the competitors. In particular, BEEI’s intensifier pump introduces unique and specific benefits to the homogenization process. Below is an overview of these benefits and insight into how they can improve your own applications.

BEEI’s intensifier pump is one component of a homogenizer pumping system that produces constant pressure and eliminates contamination. It is found in each DeBEE model, which means that it is accessible to applications in each stage of the product development process. From the laboratory DeBEE used for R&D to the pilot-plant DeBEE for clinical testing, and to the industrial homogenizer used in manufacturing, the intensifier pump found in a homogenization system helps to impart pressures of up to 45,000 PSI. This intensive pressure is key to the unique power of the DeBEE homogenizer model, as it is not only effective but also efficient. While many other homogenizer models require more than 3 passes for a desired outcome, the 1-2 passes achieved by the DeBEE saves time and money on reagents and chemicals.

At this point, you may be wondering how specifically the intensifier pump can be helpful in your own homogenization applications. The pressure created largely through the intensifier pumps helps to achieve both particle size reduction and a homogenous mixture. The need for these two results is seen across fields, primarily within the pharmaceutical, food, and biotechnology industries; for example, synthesis of drugs like tablets and spray development of nanoparticles to be incorporated into innovative medicines is dependent on reduced droplet size. And homogenization of milk, pharmaceutical syrups, and various food products is dependent on the intensifier pump’s constant process.

BEE International: The Homogenizer Advantage

On determining which homogenizer will be right for your lab, begin your search with BEE International Technology. We are globally recognized among laboratory managers and researchers for their high quality products and excellent customer support. Particle size reduction is just one of a variety of applications for our homogenizers; nano/micro emulsions, cell lysis, lipids, suspensions, and dispersions are also easily achievable. Additionally, the homogenizer processes can be controlled to suit your product, which will allow you to customize to your cell type. And finally, the equipment is easy to use, produces higher yield in less time, and achieves results that are reproducible and scalable.

Learn more about how BEE homogenizers can improve your experimentation by contacting us today. 

For more information on cell lysis methods and how to choose the right one for your needs, download our FREE eBook: 

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Topics: Homogenization

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